Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Singapore Strike: The Full Story [Wall Street Journal] #Singapore #RisingChina

The Chinese bus-driver strike is Singapore’s first real strike in decades.

Push has become pull. Along with China’s rise and more self-assured place in the world, more Chinese are turning to a sojourn from the mainland for a better economic future.  This recent surge in numbers has solidified the overseas Chinese presence overseas, now accounting for easily over fifty million.

Above, Singapore’s historical strike data from 1946 to 2009. In this chart, man-days lost refer to the total number of working days lost annually due to industrial action. It is calculated by multiplying the duration of industrial actions (in days) with the number of workers that were affected. Source - Ministry of Manpower, Singapore

Above, Singapore’s historical strike data from 1946 to 2009. In this chart, man-days lost refer to the total number of working days lost annually due to industrial action. It is calculated by multiplying the duration of industrial actions (in days) with the number of workers that were affected. Source – Ministry of Manpower, Singapore

The contrast with China’s >100,000 mass incidents yearly shows a stark difference in approach.

The Chinese tolerate a certain level of dissent, Wukan is a good example.

In this case, I believe the drivers simply felt they ran out of viable options and decided to go for broke, and go straight to the decision makers just like they would back home.

– – –

Singapore Strike: The Full Story
By WSJ Staff Reporter Chun Han Wong

This story of a strike by Chinese bus drivers in Singapore offers a close-up look at a major issue facing the Southeast Asian city-state today: The growing number of migrant workers who underpin Singapore’s economy and the social tensions that their presence can generate. 

What happened over two days in late November 2012 rattled the foundations of Singapore’s economic success – its business-friendly governance and industrial harmony – and prompted a robust response from the government.

The strike, a rarity in Singapore, resonated across Asia, where other countries are grappling with a growing dependence on foreign labor, too. And it provided a window into ordinary lives seldom-seen: the migrants who fan out from China in search of a fatter paycheck abroad.

How to balance the need for new workers from overseas with the preservation of established ways, presents a major dilemma that policymakers and citizens will wrestle with for years to come.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Wall Street Journal online.

Advertisements

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, China Dream, Chinese Model, Culture, Economics, Education, Ethnicity, Government & Policy, Greater China, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Singapore, Social, Soft Power, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Wall Street Journal

U.S. Seen Losing to China as World Leader [Pew Global Attitudes Project / Wall Street Journal] #RisingChina #Perception

Brand China making headway outside its borders.

China will replace America as the leading superpower, according to an international global attitudes survey released on Thursday, even though just half of the nations polled view China favourably.

These are among the major findings of the Pew Research Centre’s Global Attitudes Project, which conducted surveys in 39 countries among 37,653 respondents from March 2 to May 1, 2013. It is the first study to gauge public responses to China to such a large scale.

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Education, Greater China, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S., Wall Street Journal

Why China’s Current Anti-Corruption Campaign is Different [Wall Street Journal] #RisingChina #Corruption #NewLeadership

By hook or by crook, this systemic dent has always impeded China’s full potential.

It has been one of its major Achilles heels since antiquity. That said and I argue again, it is not corruption that troubles, but the means of facilitating one’s ascent in contemporary Chinese society. One need to be a an increasingly big spender to afford an entourage. The entourage too has mouths to feed and the mouths are real. Desires are at a all fine high with advertising texts robbing Chinese skylines of their natural harmony with the environment – today feeding consumerism is the name of the game.

The one seeking ascendancy is no longer feeding an entourage of farmers from the village. The downstream effect that you have to be generous too their family to gain utmost trust is an expensive one in today’s terms.

A study of the major Chinese narratives and works of literature, right down to contemporary state sponsored Chinese-made TV today reveals much. It is an inherently deep Chinese lament. In the past when the Chinese echelons got corrupt and softened, foreign powers sat on their throne as recent as living memory.

Wang Qishan – man for the job to prevent this negative slide?

– – –

Why China’s Current Anti-Corruption Campaign is Different
By Russell Leigh Moses
Dean of Academics and Faculty at The Beijing Center for Chinese Studies
Source – Wall Street Journal China Realtime Report, published May 30, 2013

After witnessing previous campaigns against corruption fizzle out, or turn into an excuse for political backstabbing, the Chinese public might well be skeptical about President Xi Jinping’s latest attempt to rectify the Communist Party.

This present campaign, however, is beginning to look very different from the usual side-stepping that is done largely to impress the public.

And if reform-minded party cadres throw their support Mr. Xi’s way, it could turn into a broader effort to make the party more accountable.

Please click here to read the full article at the Wall Street Journal.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Collectivism, Communications, Corruption, Domestic Growth, Education, Finance, Fu Er Dai 富二代, Government & Policy, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, Infrastructure, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, Wall Street Journal

Beijing’s Paranoid Worldview [Wall Street Journal] #RisingChina #DefenseWhitePaper

Clarity gleaned from a defense white paper?

Nowhere is the gulf between reality and Beijing’s aggrieved worldview more apparent than in the white paper’s discussion of the U.S. The report claims that U.S. President Barack Obama’s so-called “pivot” to Asia “makes the situation tenser,” by “enhancing military deployment and also strengthen[ing] alliances.” In Chinese eyes, the U.S. pivot is not responding to nearly two decades of double-digit Chinese defense budget increases and Beijing’s aggressive security stance. Instead, Washington is finding a new bogeyman for a post-Iraq, post-Afghanistan world.

– – –

Beijing’s Paranoid Worldview
By Michael Auslin
Source – Wall Street Journal, published April 18, 2013

20130422-074528.jpg

Source – Zuma Press
A Chinese missile destroyer fires during a joint naval exercise in March.

When Beijing released its defense white paper on Tuesday, official Chinese media hailed the document as a milestone in government transparency. The report, the first of its kind since 2011, is certainly clarifying—but not just because of its dry recitation of China’s defense activities and structure.

Written by the Ministry of Defense, the white paper is China’s equivalent of the U.S. National Defense Strategy, spelling out security priorities and giving basic information about China’s military programs. Aimed primarily at a foreign audience, this year’s report included for the first time personnel figures for China’s main armed forces. The total headcount of 1.4 million, while formidable, was below what international organizations have calculated. This is possibly because paramilitary and police forces, which often act as a national guard, were excluded from the count.

Nevertheless, outsiders can safely view the white paper as about the clearest public statement available of Beijing’s strategic worldview. And what a worrying statement it is. The white paper’s excoriation of the U.S. and Japan, as well as its unapologetic promise to protect territorial claims by “all necessary measures,” should convince U.S. leaders that President Xi Jinping will do little to improve relations between Beijing and Washington. A larger, more powerful and more influential China still sees itself at odds with the world.

Please click here to read the article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Communications, Government & Policy, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, Media, military, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S., Wall Street Journal

Challenge China to Free Tibetans [Wall Street Journal] #RisingChina #Tibet

Truth or dare? For more on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, go here.

– – –

Challenge China to Free Tibet
Xi Jinping needs to hear that religious freedom is the only way to stop self-immolations.
By Elliott Abrams and Azizah Al-Hibri
Source – Wall Street Journal, published April 21, 2013

When Kal Kyi, a 30-year-old mother of four, set herself on fire in March to protest Chinese repression of Tibet, she joined a grim and growing fellowship of despair. Over the past four years, 112 Tibetans have immolated themselves in protest against Chinese oppression.

Tibet is burning, and the world community, including the U.S., must speak out. China’s new president, Xi Jinping, and the rest of its leadership must be persuaded that its interests lie with respecting human rights, particularly freedom of religion, and to restart discussions with Tibet’s exiled leader, the Dalai Lama.

Unfortunately, persuading Beijing is no simple task. China’s rulers have dug in their heels on Tibet as self-immolations continue to mount. They have expanded repressive measures while accusing foreign forces of fueling Tibetan grievances.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, Government & Policy, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Peacekeeping, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Random, Religion, Social, Soft Power, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, Tibet, Wall Street Journal, Xi Jinping, , ,

China’s Newest Export: Laughter #WSJ #China #Cinema

Comic cinema: Into China’s soft power toolbox.

– – –

China’s Newest Export: Laughter
Dean Napolitano, Originally posted on Speakeasy
Source – Wall Street Journal China Realtime Report, published February 11, 2013

Source - Enlight Pictures, in WSJ China Realtime Report

Source – Enlight Pictures, in WSJ China Realtime Report

What does a contemporary Chinese comedy look like?

American audiences have an opportunity to answer that question as China’s biggest box-office hit ever for a domestically made movie opened in major cities on Friday.

“Lost in Thailand,” a low-budget comedy that hit theaters Dec. 12 in China and is still in release there, steamrolled its competition during the important end-of-year period when many Chinese blockbusters are released. The battle for box-office supremacy included Jackie Chan’s action-adventure “CZ12,” which scored big with audiences but was no match for “Lost in Thailand,” and Chow Yun-fat’s World War II-era drama “The Last Tycoon.”

The man behind the Mandarin-language comedy is its 40-year-old star, Xu Zheng, who also directed, produced and co-wrote the film on a modest budget of $6 million.

Please click here to read the article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Art, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Government & Policy, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Media, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Wall Street Journal

Red Riding Hood Protests in Hong Kong [Wall Street Journal]

Is universal suffrage for Hong Kong by 2017 possible? One country, two systems but one election outcome? Leung Chun-Ying’s annointment as new chief executive is not well received.

Up to 15,000 Hong Kongers pay tribute to the Brothers Grimm as Red Riding Hood Protests in Hong Kong highlight pro-democracy movements in the former British colony.

For more – Even China must now realise that it needs a better way to pick Hong Kong’s leader (Economist, March 31, 2012)

TO CALL the process by which Hong Kong’s new chief executive was anointed on March 25th a flawed election is to make a category error. It was not an election at all (see article). Most of those on the “election committee” that chose Leung Chun-ying, known as C.Y. Leung and pictured right, were not really free to exercise any sort of choice. Of the 1,193 committee members who voted (out of Hong Kong’s population of over 7m), many did so under orders from Beijing. Of those not favoured with clear instructions, many were second-guessing what they thought Beijing wanted them to do.

– – –

Red Riding Hood Protests in Hong Kong
by Te-Ping Chen
Source – Wall Street Journal, published April 2, 2012

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street to demonstrate against the Chinese government’s meddling into the Hong Kong’s chief executive election in Hong Kong on April 1, 2012.

In a march themed with fanciful allusions to Little Red Riding Hood, thousands of protestors swarmed Hong Kong’s streets on Sunday in the first large display of protest since the city’s elite tapped a Beijing ally to become the Chinese territory’s next leader.

Leung Chun-ying, who is seen as having close ties to China’s Communist Party, has been nicknamed a “wolf” by local media. Protestors worry that he will weaken Hong Kong’s traditional commitment to civil liberties and freedom of speech, though Mr. Leung has adamantly maintained he will maintain the city’s core values.

On Sunday afternoon, protestors carried a giant replica of a wolfskin, and many of the women wore red scarves, in a nod to the Grimm Brothers’ fairy tale. Thousands of protesters surged through the streets, shouting pro-democracy slogans, some of them wearing spray-painted models of tanks fashioned out of cardboard in a reference to the 1989 Tiananmen Square incident. Mr. Leung was selected for his post by a majority of the 1,200-member election committee. Beijing has promised the Chinese territory universal suffrage by 2017. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Democracy, Government & Policy, Hong Kong, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Politics, Public Diplomacy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Wall Street Journal

Chinese Millionaires Are Heading West [Wall Street Journal]

The Chinese pursuit of a better future for their children could mean heading West for now as they tire of ‘GDP worship’.

This video report from the Wall Street Journal looks at some reasons why wealthy Chinese are heading West with clean air perhaps unsurprisingly listed. For writer Shi Kang (his blog in Mandarin here), his foremost reason to head West is to raise children.

– – –

Chinese Millionaires Are Heading West
by Angela Yeoh, Beijing
Source – Wall Street Journal, published Feb 23, 2012

Best-selling writer Shi Kang is one of a growing number of Chinese millionaires looking to leave China, in search of a better life and a healthier environment for their families. WSJ’s Angela Yeoh reports from Beijing.

Filed under: Chinese overseas, Culture, Domestic Growth, Education, Environment, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Media, Overseas Chinese, People, Social, The Chinese Identity, U.S., Wall Street Journal

China Needs Butlers [Wall Street Journal]

The Chinese have been a source of cheap labour and domestic help worldwide since the eighteenth century. As the twenty-first moves into its second decade, it is intriguing to see how the tables have turned with British butlers a ‘must’ to ‘accessorise’ newly purchased mansions for the newly wealthy in China, India and the Middle East. Keeping with the times or is this a subtle cultural dig back at former colonial masters?

– – –

China Needs Butlers
By Robert Frank
Source – Wall Street Journal, December 14, 2011

The butler economy may be slow to rebound in the U.S., but it’s booming in China.

According to Bloomberg, Britain’s Guild of Professional English Butlers has trained 20% more butlers in 2011 than 2010, and demand is outstripping supply. The Bespoke Bureau in London, which also trains butlers, said butler training is up 52%. Bespoke recently placed a butler with a salary of $158,390 for a rich family in the United Arab Emirates, the article said.

“There is a shortage of them,” Bespoke’s owner told Bloomberg.

One big reason: China. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Bloomberg, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Influence, Social, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.K., U.S., Wall Street Journal

Investors Spooked by China [Wall Street Journal]

Collateral damage? Baidu and Sina reportedly suffer loss in investor confidence due to alleged accounting frauds at little-known Chinese companies listed in the U.S.

– – –

Investors Spooked by China
Small-Stock Accounting Scandals Are Breeding Deeper Fears
By OWEN FLETCHER And DINNY MCMAHON
Source – Wall Street Journal, published September 30, 2011

A man watches computer monitors at an office in Shanghai. Photo – Reuters

BEIJING—Investors dumped the stocks of some of China’s biggest Internet companies, as scandals with some smaller Chinese firms has shaken Wall Street’s confidence in the country’s businesses.

U.S.-listed shares of China’s leading search engine, Baidu.com Inc., and Sina Corp., the operator of the country’s Twitter-like messaging service, plunged 16% and 18%, respectively, in the last two days of trading on the Nasdaq Stock Market even though these companies haven’t been accused of wrongdoing.

A series of alleged accounting frauds this year at little-known Chinese companies listed in the U.S. has triggered a sharp shift in sentiment among investors, who are now worried about hidden business risks or financial problems. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Corruption, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Finance, Fraud, Influence, Internet, Media, Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S., Wall Street Journal

Follow me on Twitter

Archives

Calendar

October 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,575 other followers

East/West headlines of Rising China

East/West headlines of Rising China

About Wandering China

Click to find out more about this project

Support //WC

Support Wandering China now - buy a Tee Shirt!

Be a champ - Support Wandering China - buy a Tee Shirt!

The East Wind Wave

China in images and infographics, by Wandering China

China in images and Infographics, by Wandering China

Wandering China: Facing west

Please click to access video

Travels in China's northwest and southwest

Wandering Taiwan

Wandering Taiwan: reflections of my travels in the democratic Republic of China

Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Click here to view the Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Slideshow reflection on Deng Xiaoping's UN General Assembly speech in 1974. Based on photos of my travels in China 2011.

East Asia Geographic Timelapse

Click here to view the East Asia Geographic Timelapse

A collaboration with my brother: Comparing East Asia's rural and urban landscapes through time-lapse photography.

Wandering Planets

Creative Commons License
Wandering China by Bob Tan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at Wanderingchina.org. Thank you for visiting //
web stats

Flag Counter

free counters
Online Marketing
Add blog to our directory.