Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Challenge China to Free Tibetans [Wall Street Journal] #RisingChina #Tibet

Truth or dare? For more on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, go here.

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Challenge China to Free Tibet
Xi Jinping needs to hear that religious freedom is the only way to stop self-immolations.
By Elliott Abrams and Azizah Al-Hibri
Source – Wall Street Journal, published April 21, 2013

When Kal Kyi, a 30-year-old mother of four, set herself on fire in March to protest Chinese repression of Tibet, she joined a grim and growing fellowship of despair. Over the past four years, 112 Tibetans have immolated themselves in protest against Chinese oppression.

Tibet is burning, and the world community, including the U.S., must speak out. China’s new president, Xi Jinping, and the rest of its leadership must be persuaded that its interests lie with respecting human rights, particularly freedom of religion, and to restart discussions with Tibet’s exiled leader, the Dalai Lama.

Unfortunately, persuading Beijing is no simple task. China’s rulers have dug in their heels on Tibet as self-immolations continue to mount. They have expanded repressive measures while accusing foreign forces of fueling Tibetan grievances.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, Government & Policy, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Peacekeeping, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Random, Religion, Social, Soft Power, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, Tibet, Wall Street Journal, Xi Jinping, , ,

Fighter planes in Tibet make first flight in Year of Dragon [People’s Daily]

Hard power over its disputed territories: Looks like the Chengdu J-10, a multi-role all-weather fighter aircraft known to some as the ‘Vigorous Dragon’ has been deployed to keep watch over Tibet. Significantly, or paradoxically, in the year of the dragon.

Fighter planes take off from military airfield in the Tibet Autonomous Region, southwest China, Jan. 31, 2012. An air force stationed in Tibet started its first flight in the Year of the Dragon Tuesday. Photo: CNSPHOTO

Full complement of 11 hard points capable of a 6000kg payload + 23mm twin-barrelled cannon. Photo: CNSPHOTO

Filed under: Influence, International Relations, J10, military, Peaceful Development, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, Tibet

Dalai Lama questions wisdom of self-immolations [BBC]

Immolations in protest against Chinese rule to date: 11.

Perhaps the death of spiritual leaders resonate stronger within the populace. China has condemned the ‘immoral and inhuman’ self-immolation campaign and the response by the Dalai Lama, reportedly to be against the effectiveness of such a sacrifice: “Courage alone is no substitute. You must utilise your wisdom.”

For the alleged video – Horrifying video of Tibetan nun in flames on street in latest self-immolation protest against China (Daily Mail, 22 November 2011). For more by the AP wires: Video released by Tibetan rights group allegedly shows Buddhist nun burning herself in protest (Washington Post 22 November 2011)

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Dalai Lama questions wisdom of self-immolations
Source – BBC, published November 18, 2011

The Dalai Lama speaks exclusively to the BBC about his worries for Tibetan monks and nuns

The Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, says he is very worried about the growing number of monks and nuns setting themselves on fire to protest against Chinese rule in Tibet.

He told the BBC he was not encouraging such actions – saying there was no doubt they required courage, but questioning how effective they were.

There have been 11 cases of self-immolation so far this year. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Greater China, Han, Influence, International Relations, Media, Migrant Workers, Migration (Internal), Nationalism, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tibet

China’s power should not make it immune to criticism over Tibet [The Age]

TIBET: Of late, Tibet has almost all but dropped out of political debate surrounding Sino-Australian ties. Is the cost of economic interdependence with China Australia’s right to speak on human rights issues – ‘The habit of rolling over and allowing Beijing to dictate the terms and shrug off constructive criticism of its handling of Tibet will hold inevitable consequences for Australia down the line.’? That said, how often do Australian politicians criticise their American strategic partners? Here’s a look at a small sample of netizen responses to this opinion piece on the Age.

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The true cost of Chinese imperialism is borne by those hiddden far away from the disinterested gaze of the outside world.
SteveH. – September 30, 2011, 7:04AM

Why do we keep seeing so much rubbish written about China and Tibet. I suggest more Australians should travel to Tibet and Nepal and see the great contrasts in these closely related regions. I have traveled in Tibet and neighboring areas many times and I see there is no evidence that the people are oppressed. They can freely practice their religion and they are enjoying an unprecedented economic boom. The regions they live in are very harsh and cold and that led to a terrible feudal system which the present Chinese Govt has eliminated. Do we long to see these people go back to their oppressive feudal system? Is that what we want to see as tourists??
Dr B S Goh | Australian in Asia – September 30, 2011, 8:16AM

Absolutely…the western world remains largely silent whilst the ethnic cleansing of Tibet continues. It’s a disgrace.
Help Tibet | Sydney – September 30, 2011, 9:18AM

There is large Chinese community in Australia, most of them are still sympathy to Communist Chinese. There is no clear benefit for Australia to concern such issues like Tibet or Taiwan. But Thanks Dr Simon, you are alone on this issue, but a like a candle light in a dark room, you will be shining like a ray of light penetrate through darkness of ignorant, greedy, and injustice. Keep it up, your soul will be enlightened and your heart will be joyed due to your moral to stand up for the weak such as Tibetan. Good work.
Elite | Lidcombe – September 30, 2011, 9:37AM

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China’s power should not make it immune to criticism over Tibet
Simon Bradshaw
Source – The Age, published September 29, 2011

You’ve likely not read about it, but tragic news emerged this week from remote Sichuan province that two teenage monks of a besieged Tibetan monastery had set themselves alight in a desperate last defence of their culture and heritage. Also this week, and given far more prominence in Australian media, Prime Minister Julia Gillard signalled a greater emphasis on relations with China while commissioning a White Paper on Australia in the Asian Century.

While clearly there was no direct link between these two incidents, their juxtaposition highlights an uncomfortable truth for the Chinese and Australian governments alike.

Such stories from Tibet have become frighteningly common and it’s well understood among a majority of Australian politicians that China’s “economic miracle” and unrelenting development drive has exacted a grave toll on the land and people of Tibet. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Economics, Environment, Foreign aid, Greater China, Han, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Nationalism, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Territorial Disputes, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tibet

100 km of frustration on Beijing-Tibet Highway [China Daily]

100 km of frustration on Beijing-Tibet Highway
Source – China Daily, published July 20, 2011

A traffic jam caused by road works stretches nearly 100 km on a section of the Beijing-Tibet Highway in Ulanqab, Inner Mongolia autonomous region, on July 19, 2011. Photo - Xinhua

Two drivers trapped by a traffic jam have to eat instant noodles for their supper, on July 19, 2011. A traffic jam caused by road works since July 10 stretches nearly 100 km on a section of the Beijing-Tibet Highway in Inner Mongolia autonomous region. Photo - Xinhua

Filed under: Automotive, Beijing Consensus, China Daily, Chinese Model, Civil Engineering, Communications, Communist Party 90th Anniversary, Domestic Growth, Infrastructure, Population, Social, Tibet, Transport

Beijing lashes out as Obama meets Dalai Lama [The Age/AFP]

Every meeting the U.S. has with the Dalai Lama urks the Chinese as it takes up significant mindshare in popular imagination. As China grows in its use of public diplomacy, this act of the U.S. meeting and giving ‘face’ to Tibet, no matter how significant in its application, is taken as the U.S. not giving face to China.

For more, the Tibet Sun’s headlines are all about this meeting today.

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Beijing lashes out as Obama meets Dalai Lama
Beijing
Source – The Age, published July 18, 2011

The Dalai Lama speaks to the media after his first meeting with US President Barack Obama in February last year. Photo: AFP

CHINA has lashed out at Washington after US President Barack Obama welcomed the Dalai Lama to the White House, saying the meeting has damaged relations between the two countries.

”Such an act has grossly interfered in China’s internal affairs, hurt the feelings of Chinese people and damaged the Sino-American relations,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in a written statement yesterday.

Mr Obama’s meeting with the Tibetan spiritual leader was a low-key affair, held away from the Oval Office where presidents traditionally meet world leaders. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AFP, Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, Media, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tibet, U.S.

Dalai Lama optimistic on spread of democracy [The Age]

Melbourne: the Dalai Lama arrives in Australia, arriving via Melbourne and saying yesterday- ”By force, the human mind never can change.”

Whether he will be meeting Julia Gillard is a question featuring heavily on the radar. Interestingly, former New South Wales Labor premier Bob Carr weighs in, ”Tibet has been part of China since the Manchu dynasty. There is no more reason China would accept a loosening of its ties with Tibet than we would accept West Australian autonomous status within the Australian federation…”

Official website here.

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Dalai Lama optimistic on spread of democracy
Farah Farouque
Source – The Age, published June 11, 2011

CHINA’S authoritarian system could not remain forever impervious to democracy, the Dalai Lama has predicted.

While governments could control people by physical force, controlling the mind and desire for freedom was a different idea, the Nobel peace prize winner said yesterday. ”By force, the human mind never can change.”

Inevitably as China became more open, repressive regimes in Burma and North Korea would follow suit. ”Plenty of reason to be optimistic,” the Dalai Lama told the Melbourne Press Club. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Han, Influence, International Relations, Media, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tibet

Tibet marks successful 6 decades [China Daily]

Tibet: 6 successful decades of liberation in the eyes of the Chinese. They see liberation. Not all agree. Some think it as an invasion masquerading as liberation. A look at the Central Tibet Administration website states perhaps quite naturally – 23 May 2011 marks the 60th anniversary of the signing of the so called  17-point Agreement between the People’s Republic of China and Tibet. This controversial document was forced on the unwilling Tibetans with an ultimatum that Tibet would be invaded by military force. (Central Tibet Administration online, May 23, 2011)

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Tibet marks successful 6 decades
By Dachiog and Peng Yining
Source – China Daily, published May 24, 2011

Tibetan women turn prayer wheels outside the Jokhang Temple in Lhasa, capital of the Tibet autonomous region, on Monday. Feng Yongbin / China Daily

LHASA – A grand ceremony was held in Potala Square on Monday morning as the Tibet autonomous region celebrated the 60th anniversary of its peaceful liberation.

In a speech at the celebration, Qiangba Puncog, head of the standing committee of the region’s people’s congress, said six decades of progress had put Tibet at a prime stage in its development. With the support of the central government and people throughout the country, Tibet is sure to embrace an even better future, he said.

More than 5,000 locals gathered in front of Potala Palace to watch the ceremony, which kicked off with the raising of the national flag. Their number included monks, officials and students. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, China Daily, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Greater China, Human Rights, Influence, military, Nationalism, People, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Social, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tibet

Dalai Lama plans to quit as Tibet political leader [Reuters]

Tibet is China’s water source (see China, Tibet, and the Strategic Power of Water, Circle of Blue, 2008) , something oft forgotten in dissecting the contemporary relationship between the two. Letting go will not be easy for the Chinese; and the down to the wire (beyond the intense political and cultural disagreements between the two) I believe the Chinese see Dalai Lama as standing in the way of this important resource.

Here is an insight into forging the democratization of a middle path that makes it harder for China to ‘to influence the course of the independence movement after his death’. And here’s a report from the China Daily in 2006 about the Dalai Lama’s ‘middle way’ (or meaningful autonomy as mentoined here)  in dealing with Tibet’s independence – ‘What is Dalai Lama’s Middle Way?’ (China Daily, July 26, 2006)

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Dalai Lama plans to quit as Tibet political leader
By Abhishek Madhukar
Source – Reuters, published March 10, 2011

DHARAMSALA, India (Reuters) – The Dalai Lama said on Thursday he would step down as Tibet’s political leader, a move seen as transforming the government-in-exile into a more assertive and democratic body in the face of Chinese pressure.

By devolving his powers, the Dalai Lama would give the prime minister greater clout as the region seeks autonomy from China. Tibetans will vote for a new prime minister this month, with the elections seen as ushering in a generation of younger, secular leaders and strengthening the movement’s global standing.

“As early as the 1960s, I have repeatedly stressed that Tibetans need a leader, elected freely by the Tibetan people, to whom I can devolve power,” the Dalai Lama said in his annual speech marking 52 years since he fled Tibet after a failed uprising against the Chinese. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Environment, Greater China, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, People, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tibet

China says Dalai Lama has to reincarnate [AsiaOne/Reuters]

An attention-grabbing headline from Reuters found in AsiaOne – China says Dalai Lama has to reincarnate?

I am not sure it sets readers in the right headspace especially since the issue of China and Tibet has moved beyond just neighbouring tension to become a oft-used international relations / human rights weapon and to a lesser extent, popular culture phenomenon.

Nevertheless, the big question in China’s mind must be – which way forward to maintain stability if the Dalai Lama elects to break tradition by finding his successor by hand-picking or democratic elections. Tricky business as the outcome can lead China appointing their own successor resulting in there being two Dalai Lamas – one recognised by officialdom and the others by the exiles. More division? I doubt China wants that. However, as with things Tibet and Japan where the feelings and hurt run deep, what the rest see as common sense is unlikely to be the order of the day.

“Tibetan Buddhism has a history of more than 1,000 years, and the reincarnation institutions of the Dalai Lama and Panchen Lama have been carried on for several hundred years…” Padma Choling

For more on Padma Choling, go here (NewsWeek, 2010)

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China says Dalai Lama has to reincarnate
Reuters
Source – AsiaOne, published Mar 07, 2011

 

Photo - AFP

It is unclear how the 76-year-old Dalai Lama, who lives in India and is revered by many Tibetans, plans to pick his successor. He has said that the succession process could break with tradition – either by being hand-picked by him or through democratic elections.

But Padma Choling, the Chinese-appointed governor of Tibet, said that the Dalai Lama had no right to abolish the institution of reincarnation, underscoring China’s hardline stance on one of the most sensitive issues for the restless and remote region. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AsiaOne, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Culture, Greater China, Human Rights, Influence, International Relations, Nationalism, People, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Reuters, Social, Soft Power, Tibet

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