Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Here flies the dragon: Chinese airlines flex their muscles [the Age] #RisingChina #Aviation

Fruits on reform to enhance connectivity checklist. Planes, working on it. Trains, ticked. Automobiles, working on it.

There is still a long road ahead for rising China to sort it its mass transit issues because quite simplify, its volume for ‘mass’ is one for larger than most countries can only dream off.

The bonus with air travel is the extended amount of positive influence that can be massaged into a short or long haul flight…

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Here flies the dragon: Chinese airlines flex their muscles
Matt O’Sullivan and Peter Cai
Source – The Age, published June 17, 2013

20130618-084905.jpg
Ready for takeoff: Passengers watch a China Southern Airlines plane take off at Shanghai’s Hongqiao International Airport last year. Photo: Reuters

Singapore Airline’s second-in-charge, Mak Swee Wah, summed up what looms on the horizon from China.

“Chinese airlines’ ambition is a reflection of the country’s ambition,” he said during a visit to Australia two weeks ago. “It is taken as a given that they will be growing aggressively.”

There is no doubt China’s airlines are beginning to flex their muscles.

In the case of China Southern, its tentative interest in a strategic stake in Qantas is reflective of a wider foray overseas by Chinese enterprises.

Please click here to read the full article at The Age.

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Filed under: Australia, Automotive, Aviation, BBC, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Domestic Growth, Government & Policy, Ideology, Influence, Infrastructure, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

Summit to avoid ‘inevitable’ US-China tensions [The Age] #RisingChina #SinoUS

Torn in a great and powerful friends dilemma, Australia’s strategy to finely leverage both its American and Chinese friendships is a challenging one.

The article below was fed across Aussie broadsheets as it comes from one of two transnational media corporations operating in Australia.

However, great power relations and perceptual tendencies (whether institutionalized, enculturated or indoctrinated) needs a twenty first century update. Using a polarizing and primal set of us and them software to decode meaning in the networked global village – raises the question, what is preventing the update – why are tensions inevitable? By design, consequence or care-lessness?

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Summit to avoid ‘inevitable’ US-China tensions
By Nick O’Malley, US correspondent for Fairfax Media
Source – The Age, published June 6, 2013

The so-called “shirt-sleeves” summit to begin between President Barack Obama and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at a glamorous estate in California on Friday will be the first of its kind in half a century, a chance for the two great powers to stave off what some fear to be inevitable tensions.

“It harkens back to Nixon and Kissinger and Mao Zedong and Zou Enlai sitting on overstuffed couches late into the night in Beijing discussing the state of the world,” says the US State Department’s former top Asia official, Kurt Campbell.

Those meetings in 1972 began the Chinese-American diplomatic relationship, a relationship that since then has been marked by mutual mistrust, not aided by the rigid formality of meetings between the two leaders.

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Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Economics, Finance, Government & Policy, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

The second US century [The Age] #RisingChina #USCentury

Not quite the Chinese Century, according to Clyde Prestowitz

China has been the great story of the past quarter-century and still is a good one. But the miracle days are past. China has followed a growth strategy based on huge investment, sometimes in excess of 50 per cent of GDP. It has now hit a point of diminishing returns. Each new dollar of investment yields a bit less growth than the previous dollar. For a long time the key question has been whether China would get rich before it gets old. The answer increasingly appears to be no.

Perhaps Australia would do well to commission another white paper: Australia in the New American Century.

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The second US century
So you think America is in decline and China on the rise? Think again.
by Clyde Prestowitz
Source – The Age, published May 14, 2013

Source - The Age Illustration: Jim Pavlidis.

Source – The Age Illustration: Jim Pavlidis.

Conventional wisdom says that America is in decline, that the American century is over, and that the future belongs to the rest, especially the rest in Asia. Predictions that China’s gross domestic product will soon surpass that of the US to become the world’s largest economy are legion.

Prominent authors such as CNN commentator Fareed Zakaria and former diplomat Kishore Mahbubani have rushed to publish books predicting a historic shift in the global balance of power as a result of this change in relative share of global GDP. And the Australian government recently indicated its agreement with this thinking by moving to redeploy its resources and reorient its policies in response to a white paper on ”Australia in the Asian Century”.

Yet, there is growing evidence that all of this analysis may be a bit premature and that America is not only coming back but that this century may well wind up being another American century.

Please click here to read the full article at the Age.

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Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

China battle plan raises nuclear fear [The Age] #RisingChina #AirSeaBattle

The Australian Strategic Policy Institute reckons the oft-misunderstood US AirSea Battle doctrine/strategy adds fuel to the spark of miscalculation – especially when applied with its Asian pivot against China.

”AirSea Battle thus raises the spectre of a series of miscalculations on both sides if Beijing perceives conventional attacks on its homeland as an attempt to disarm its nuclear strike capability, in which case it might be faced with a classical ‘use them or lose them dilemma’.”

Some AirSea Battle perspectives:

The goal is to ensure all forces can get to the fight
Air-Sea Battle: Clearing the Fog (Armed Forces Journal, May 2012)

… popular consensus says ASB is the Pentagon’s plan to counter China; Most recently, the Washington Post made the assumption in his Thursday page one story on ASB… The heads of the Navy and Air Force swear this isn’t true. But they’ve had trouble making this case — in large part, because they’ve been so awful at explaining ASB to the public.
Pentagon’s ‘Air-Sea Battle’ Plan Explained. Finally.
Wired, August 2012

Also, to find out more about the genesis and operations of AirSea Battle, Andrew Marshall go to –
U.S. model for a future war fans tensions with China and inside Pentagon (Washington Post, August 2012)

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China battle plan raises nuclear fear
By David Wroe
Source – The Age, published April 15, 2013

A US military strategy being mapped out to deal with the growing power of China in the western Pacific – a plan that would inevitably ensnare Australia – could escalate into a nuclear war, experts warn.

In a new paper the Australian Strategic Policy Institute says the fashionable ”AirSea Battle” concept – which Washington strategists are developing to keep the US grip on its sea and air power near the Chinese mainland – contains ”uncertainties and potential shortfalls” that could heighten the nuclear risk.

The paper, written by the institute’s senior analyst for defence strategy, Benjamin Schreer, urges the Australian government to keep a cautious distance from the plan for now. Australia would probably play a role in the strategy, particularly with US Marines in Darwin.

The AirSea Battle plan assumes any conflict between the US and China – most likely over Taiwan or Chinese skirmishing with Japan – would remain below the level of nuclear strikes.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Australia, Charm Offensive, Government & Policy, Hard Power, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, military, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Gillard’s quest for front row seat before the music stops [The Age] #SinoAustralianTies #RisingChina

Will this round of significant bilateral affirmation come to naught if the Aussie leadership changes hands come September?

This is a multifaceted harvest for Australia. It includes direct convertibility sidewinding the USD$ in trade, strategic military partnerships and the unprecedented move for an institutionalized annual leaders’ face to face meetings to lock in its number one customer for the longer run. See – China deal paves way for ‘frank talk‘ (The Age]

However, also consider –
Professor Hugh White (The Age TV) on the pitfalls of over stretching this trilateral dance with the US and China

For the Chinese perspective,

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard delivers a speech at the China Executive Leadership Academy Pudong (CELAP) during her visit in Shanghai, east China, April 8, 2013. (Xinhua/Chen Fei)

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Gillard’s quest for front row seat before the music stops
By Laurie Pearcey
Source – The Age, published April 9, 2013
66 comments as of April 10, 2013

20130411-022853.jpg
Taking initiative: Prime Minister Julia Gillard in Shanghai as part of her six-day China visit.

Gillard lands big one with China deal

Comment: PM puts name on board and gets relationship on track

It is surely one of history’s great ironies that Richard Milhous Nixon, champion of the McCarthy era and fierce anti-communist, is remembered with great fondness and nostalgia in China as America’s finest statesman.

With this week’s Newspoll showing the Gillard government still destined for electoral oblivion, it’s not too cheeky to ask how Sino-Australian history will remember the Gang of Four Labor frontbenchers finishing up their six-day visit to China.

That three of her cabinet colleagues and no fewer than three business delegations accompanied the Prime Minister demonstrates to Beijing that Australia is well and truly committed to the bilateral relationship.

This stuff matters in the world of Chinese diplomacy.

When Xi Jinping last visited Australia in 2010 he was accompanied by a retinue of ministers, vice-ministers and a business delegation of more than 300 company executives from the length and breadth of China’s provinces and powerful state-owned enterprises.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Boao Forum 2013, Charm Offensive, Communications, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, History, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, military, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Soft Power, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

Cartoon – Chinese Base in Australia to defend against American Imperialism #SinoAustralianRelations #Cartoon [The Age]

… contemplating Australia’s twenty-first century dilemma – choreographing between two great powers.

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Ron Tandberg
Source – The Age, published April 9, 2013

Source - CARTOON OF THE DAY by Ron Tandberg (The Age, 2013)

Source – CARTOON OF THE DAY by Ron Tandberg (The Age, 2013)

Further reading:
Tasmania visit for Chinese leader on the cards soon? (Mercury News)  Apparently in Xi Jinping’s former political roles he had a chance to visit every Australian state save for Tasmania.

Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Communications, Economics, Government & Policy, Hard Power, History, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Resources, Soft Power, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

‘The Kate effect’: China in grip of first lady fever as Peng steps out [The Age] #China #softpower]

Whatever term one uses, it is simply soft power, Chinese style.

China has a recent history of esteemed First Ladies captured widely in popular culture for years. If she can ignite the imagination of the the women around Greater China the that would boost the Chinese sphere of influence greatly. Their consensus would have mean a more finely tuned Chinese model for growth down this new period.

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‘The Kate effect’: China in grip of first lady fever as Peng steps out
Malcolm Moore in Beijing for the Daily Telegraph
Source – The Age, published March 25, 2013

China’s new president flew out of Moscow on Sunday pronouncing himself “deeply satisfied” with his first official trip overseas. But back home, the only topic of conversation was his elegant wife.
Footage of Peng Liyuan, 49, triggered first lady fever in the Chinese media and on the internet.
Mrs Peng, a Chinese folk singer and major-general in the Chinese army who sings for the People’s Liberation Army, is arguably just as famous in China as her husband, Xi Jinping, who was inaugurated as president two weeks ago.

20130325-091812.jpg

“Graceful”: Peng Liyuan. Photo: AFP

“Now is the end of our quest for a graceful first lady,” wrote the deputy editor of the Hong Kong Commercial Daily newspaper on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter.

Yesterday, the Beijing News ran a full page of stories about Mrs Peng’s itinerary in Moscow, alongside a photograph of her arriving at a speech dressed in an elegant Chinese-style silk tunic and skirt.

“In her role as first lady on this visit abroad, Peng Liyuan is exhibiting China’s soft power,” Wang Fan, head of the Institute of International Relations at China Foreign Affairs University, told the newspaper. The footage of her in Moscow quickly caused something akin to the “Kate Middleton effect”, with copies of a black coat she wore instantly appearing on Taobao, an online shopping site, for 499 yuan ($76.76), and advertised as “in the same style as the first lady’s”.

“Her shoes are really classic, and who designed her bag?” wrote another user on Weibo. In fact, a black leather clutch she carried was made to order by a Chinese firm in the south-western city of Chengdu.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Greater China, Influence, International Relations, Media, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Telegraph UK, The Age, The Chinese Identity, U.K.

China again at the crossroads [The Age] #China #NewLeadership #XiJinPing

Xi Jinping follows Hu Jintao’s footsteps in a great display the Chinese continue to prioritize ties with their northern neighbours. Treating Russia with respect helps ensure the >;;3500 km Sino-Russia border is free of concern. Though fundamental that is now only the tip of the iceberg.

It has certainly provoked a response with Xi Jinping splashed with a rather dodgy title on the cover of Time magazine.

Here is an Australian perspective on the symbolism of China’s looking to Moscow.

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China again at the crossroads
Xi Jinping will make his first presidential visit to Russia. But who will view it most favourably: conservatives or free marketeers?
By John Garnaut
Source – The Age, published March 14, 2013

20130315-080209.jpg

Illustration by Time Magazine, 2013

When Deng Xiaoping was rising to power Time magazine made him ”Man of the Year” for 1978 ”because of the tremendous enterprise he has launched to propel the nation into the modern world”.

But when Xi Jinping landed on the cover of Time at an equivalent point in his ascendancy, in October 2012, they drenched him in an eerie red, looking more like Satan than a hero, under a headline: The Next Leader of the Unfree World.

In January 1979 Deng defined the direction of the country by heading to the US where he donned a cowboy hat, symbolically steering his country away from the Soviet Union and towards the markets of the West.

Please click here to read rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Europe, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Russia, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Xi Jinping

Support for Bo grows before China’s ‘trial of the century’ [The Age] #China #BoXilai

The Age from Australia does an update on the Chinese leadership’s most high level purge in recent years.

This may digress, but a visit to Chongqing earlier this year was most useful to get a feel of Bo Xilai’s work – it was a largely cultured and sophisticated city where for once, crossing roads were not matters of life and death. Motorists did not ignore traffic signals. And people queued for cabs, food, anything, in an orderly fashion. It sure was different from the dozen over cities visited prior. Alas, it is hard to tell from an endless stream of secondary sources claiming to understand the dramatics of this high level purge.

Though the source is unnamed – the quote does give some semblance of a useful point – ‘‘A dead pig has no fear of boiling soup,” said the associate, who grew up close to the Bo family in Zhongnanhai. ”It is the party that has a very hot potato in its hands.”

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Support for Bo grows before China’s ‘trial of the century’
By John Garnaut
China correspondent for Fairfax Media
Source – The Age, published February 13, 2013

20130224-080945.jpg

BEIJING: The purge of Bo Xilai is in danger of losing momentum as the maverick political star remains defiant and associates question the fairness of keeping him in jail while other tainted leaders remain free.

Support for the charismatic and polarising leader has grown over the Spring Festival break as powerful princelings visit one another’s families and gather to share opinions and information, several princelings and close observers have told Fairfax Media.

One lifelong associate of Mr Bo said the handling of the case was a challenge for the Communist Party rather than Mr Bo, whose political execution was not in doubt.

”A dead pig has no fear of boiling soup,” said the associate, who grew up close to the Bo family in Zhongnanhai. ”It is the party that has a very hot potato in its hands.”

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Bo Xilai, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Corruption, Government & Policy, Media, New Leadership, Politics, Reform, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity

China muscles US in Pacific #TheAge #China #US #ChinaDream #GreatPower

Any facet of an assertive rising China seems to give the status quo the chills.

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China muscles US in Pacific
By John Garnaut
Source – The Age, published February 16, 2013

WITHIN two decades the United States will be forced out of the western Pacific, says a senior Chinese military officer, amid concerns that increasingly militarised great-power rivalry could lead to war.

Senior Colonel Liu Mingfu, at the People’s Liberation Army’s National Defence University, told Fairfax Media this week that American strategic influence would be confined ”east of the Pacific midline” as it is displaced by Chinese power throughout east Asia, including Australia.
Colonel Liu’s interpretation of one facet of what the new Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, calls ”a new type of great-power relationship” adds to the uncertainty and anxiety surrounding China’s strategic ambitions.

It clashes with comments days earlier by his university colleague, General Zhu Chenghu, who told a conference in the US: ”We have no intention of driving the US out of east Asia or the western Pacific.”

Please click here to read the restof the article at its source.

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Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Government & Policy, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, japan, military, Politics, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

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