Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

A cool idea in summer: Carving on watermelon to boost sales [People’s Daily Online] #RisingChina #StreetInnovation

Genius – Where words fail, artful watermelon carvings speak!

– – –

Shen Dongbin shows cartoon figures carved on watermelons at his watermelon stall in northwest China's Lanzhou on July 4, 2013. Photo Source Photo - Xinhua

Shen Dongbin shows cartoon figures (includes Paul Frank as above, PSY, Doraemon) carved on watermelons at his watermelon stall in northwest China’s Lanzhou on July 4, 2013. Photo   – Xinhua

Source – People’s Daily Online, published July 5, 2013

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Source - weibo screen grab in Kotaku

Source – weibo screen grab in Kotaku

Source - weibo screen grab in Kotaku

Source – weibo screen grab in Kotaku

Source – These Are China’s Watermelon Kids (Kotaku, August 10, 2013)

 

Also, see The Chinese craze for ‘watermelon kids’ (Telegraph, August 10, 2013)

 

Filed under: Art, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Food, Mapping Feelings, People, People's Daily, Population, Public Diplomacy, Social, The Chinese Identity

Whistleblower welcome in China [People’s Daily] #RisingChina #

Interesting response from the People’s Daily suggesting the floodgates of intertextuality are wide open…

To further understand the likes of Snowden, let us end with a narrative by the character Red from the Shawshank Redemption as he rationalizes the escape of his friend Andy: “Some birds are not meant to be caged. Their feathers are just too bright. And when they fly away, the part of you that knows it was a sin to lock them up does rejoice.”

For more, see US suggests whistleblower ‘in league with the Chinese’ (The Age, June 15, 2013)

– – –

Whistleblower welcome in China
By Xu Peixi (China.org.cn)
Source – People’s Daily, published June 14, 2013

By Gou Ben - China.org.cn

By Gou Ben – China.org.cn

Last week, a bright idealistic young man named Edward Snowden almost single-handedly opened the lid on the U.S. National Security Agency’s PRISM program, a program which marks the bleakest moment yet in the history of the Internet due to its scope, exact country of origin and implications.

In terms of scope, major transnational service providers ranging from Google to Apple are involved in allowing the NSA to access their customers’ data for the purposes of “surveillance.” Nearly all types of services ranging from email to VoIP have come within the program’s scope and it originates in a country which dominates the world’s Internet resources – a fact which is acknowledged in the information leaked by Snowden clearly states: “Much of the world’s communications flow through the U.S.” and the information is accessible. The case indicates that through outsourcing and contracting, Big Brother is breaching the fundamental rights of citizens by getting unfettered access to their most personal communications.

As the case unfolds, there are many things to worry about. How do we make sense of the fact that the market and the state colluded in the abuse of private information via what represents the backbone of many modern day infrastructures? How do we rationalize the character of Snowden and his fellow whistleblowers? How do we understand the one-sided cyber attack accusations the U.S. has poured upon China in the past few months? To what degree have foreign users of these Internet services fallen victim to this project? Among all these suspicions, let us clarify two types of American personality.

Please click here to read the full article at People’s Daily.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Cyberattack, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, History, Ideology, Influence, Internet, Mapping Feelings, Media, military, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, People's Daily, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Percussion shows me the world [People’s Daily] #RisingChina #GlobalPulse #Percussion

Good stuff! No pulse = no life.

Better days ahead for the global pulse…

without the excess baggage of visual culture nor colour symbolism.

– – –

Percussion shows me the world
Edited and translated by Huang Jin
Source – People’s Daily Online, published June 14, 2013

The performance “Mountain Drums” played by 39 visually impaired students from Guiyang Special School won gold prize at Disabled Arts Festival of Guizhou Province on June 7, 2013. The 39 students, from 9 to 21, are from a world without color.

Because of the visual impairment, the practice is very hard for them. However, the percussion brings them happiness and tears, and shows them the world…

Long Wei, a sophomore, practices drum. He never stops practicing, even in April when his mother died. Pnoto - Chinanews, by Zhang Yuan

Long Wei, a sophomore, practices drum. He never stops practicing, even in April when his mother died. Pnoto – Chinanews, by Zhang Yuan

An Xingxing, 9, the youngest player in the team, practices percussion. It was the third bamboo tube that she has broken. Photo - Chinanews by Zhang Yuan

An Xingxing, 9, the youngest player in the team, practices percussion. It was the third bamboo tube that she has broken. Photo – Chinanews by Zhang Yuan

A teacher holds the students' hands and teaches them how to feel the rhythm. Source - Chinanews by Zhang Yuan)

A teacher holds the students’ hands and teaches them how to feel the rhythm. Source – Chinanews by Zhang Yuan)

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Disabilities, Domestic Growth, Education, Entertainment, Ideology, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Music, Peaceful Development, People, People's Daily, Population, Social, Soft Power, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity

Beijing cracking down on illegal barbecues [People’s Daily] #RisingChina #BeijingBBQCulture #Pollution

Perhaps a shift to hot plate technology is in order.

– – –

Beijing cracking down on illegal barbecues
By Zheng Xin
Source – Peoples’ Daily, published May 14, 2013

Beijing is stepping up efforts to reduce illegal barbeques, to cut down on roadside airand noise pollution.

May is the peak time for outdoor grill cooking, which takes a heavy toll on air quality,traffic and residents, said Dang Xuefeng, spokesman for the capital’s bureau of cityadministration and law enforcement.

“As the weather warms up, the streets gradually fill up with roadside barbecue spots,sizzling kebabs on the grill and cold beer, which also create serious air pollution andundesired noise for the neighborhoods,” he said.

Please click here to read the full article at Peoples’ Daily.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Climate Change, Culture, Domestic Growth, Entertainment, Environment, Influence, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, People, People's Daily, Pollution, Social, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, Trade

Designation of China’s group army no longer secret to public [People’s Daily]

Giant leap ahead in terms of transparency or timely reveal in a period when China feels a need to respond to the threat of containment?

– – –

Designation of China’s group army no longer secret to public
Edited and translated by Li Xiang
Source – People’s Daily Online, published January 16, 2013

Source - Changjiang Daily, Illustration by Global Times

1. the 65th Group Army in Zhangjiakou, Hebei Province
2. the 38th Group Army in Baoding, Hebei Province
3. the 27th Group Army in Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province
4. the 16th Group Army in Changchun, Jilin Province
5. the 39th Group Army in Liaoyang, Liaoning Province
6. the 40th Group Army in Jinzhou, Liaoning Province
7. the 54th Group Army in Xinxiang, Henan Province
8. the 20th Group Army in Kaifeng, Henan Province
9. the 26th Group Army in Weifang, Shandong Province
10. the 12th Group Army in Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province
11. the 1st Group Army in Huzhou, Zhejiang Province
12. the 31st Group Army in Xiamen, Fujian Province
13. the 42nd Group Army in Huizhou, Guangdong Province
14. the 41th Group Army in Liuzhou, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region
15. the 14th Group Army in Kunming, Yunnan Province
16. the 13rd Group Army in Chongqing
17. the 21st Group Army in Baoji, Shaanxi Province
18. the 47th Group Army in Lintong, Shaanxi Province
Source – Changjiang Daily, Illustration by Global Times

The designation of China’s group army is no longer confidential information to the public as of Jan. 15, 2013, reported by CCTV news Tuesday.

“How do snipers practice shooting with great precision in such severe coldness. The reporter has witnessed snipers from the 39th Group Army in the Shenyang military area having military drill under the severely cold condition”, CTV military news reported. This is the first time that the designation of a group army was exposed to the public.

Last night, CCTV military channel has announced through Weibo that,The designation of group army is unveiled as of today”. According to the information, the designation of PLA group army can be used to the public instead of referred to as “a group army” This act indicates ” more open presentation of Chinese army” Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, global times, Government & Policy, Hard Power, Influence, military, Nationalism, People's Daily, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, , , , , ,

China announces new rules to further increase gov’t transparency [News of the CCP]

An official view toward disclosure: In interpersonal relationships, relativist understanding comes with disclosure. Will China’s move toward greater government transparency heal the rifts forming from the 180,000 and growing mass incidents? The only issue I see is that the imposition of a rule on a Chinese way of life (indeed, the line between guanxi and favours and hence corruption can be a very grey one in the Chinese context) might not truly understand the source of problem; which stems as far back as Chinese civilisation itself.

From the site ‘News of the Communist Party of China’, run by Peoples’ Daily Online 人民网 the online presence of Peoples’ Daily 人民日报. This is an organ of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China 中国共产党中央委员会.

Here three approaches of increasing government transparency are discussed.

1. Reducing unnecessary government spending
2. Saying no to “buying only expensive things instead of right ones”
3. Reducing paperwork and meetings

– – –

China announces new rules to further increase gov’t transparency
by Liu Yizhan, Huang Xiaoxi and Cui Jin
Source – News of the Communist Party of China, published July 12, 2012

The Regulations on the Management of Governmental Affairs, which was promulgated by China’s State Council on July 9 as the country’s first administrative regulations in this regard, focus on major government issues of public concern such as the disclosure of information regarding government spending on official receptions, vehicles, and overseas trips, government procurement, and conference management. The regulations establish the basic principles for governmental affairs.

Reducing unnecessary government spending

When central government departments were just considering banning shark fins at official receptions, Wenzhou, a coastal city in southeast China’s Zhejiang province, recently issued an official statement forbidding expensive food and drinks such as wild yellowfin tuna, abalones, shark fins, sea cucumbers, Maotai, and Wuliangye or luxury cigarettes at official receptions. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Collectivism, Corruption, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, Environment, Finance, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Peaceful Development, People, People's Daily, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, The Chinese Identity

Why Chinese people love luxury goods? [People’s Daily]

State media takes a view on the Chinese love for luxury goods. Back home in Singapore I see it first hand. They have taken over the Japanese and Indonesian big spenders in the island state, and very often pay in cash. Getting rich quick has certainly changed the complexion of Chinese wants, desires and behavior.

– – –

Why Chinese people love luxury goods?
By Li Qian
People’s Daily translation from the Chinese version: 为啥都爱买“LV”
Source: People’s Daily, published July 3, 2012

Edited and translated by People’s Daily Online

Nowadays, the Chinese people’s huge demand for luxury goods is astonishing. In front of the Louis Vuitton shop on the Champs Elysees Avenue in Paris, a number of Chinese tourists are spending hours of valuable tourist time queuing for the expensive bags. Entering the shop, they bought several valuable bags without asking about the prices. The Beijing International Top Lifestyle Brand (Luxury Goods) Exposition just ended at the World Trade Center of Beijing, reaching 670 million yuan of intended turnover, and 92 percent of the exhibitors have booked a booth for next year. Industry insiders generally agree that China will be the world’s fastest growing market for luxury goods and it is expected to share more than 20 percent of the global luxury market by 2015.

Luxury goods refer to those top branded consumer products which are beyond the living needs of ordinary people. Therefore, the foreign luxury lovers and collectors tend to be the old and rich people. The luxury goods mostly are products with cultural connotations and owning the luxury goods means to have a culture. However, there mainly are three luxury consumer groups in China: the rich flaunting fortune and manifesting identity, the young people gaining a sense of satisfaction and the bribers for mutual collusion and commercially “hidden rules.”

With the rapid development of national economy and the enhancement of thepurchasing power, the luxury consumption Chinese people also got a certain development. The consumer perception of the people to the luxury goods needs to be guided and showing off the wealth to prove their self-esteem shows a lack of intrinsic value. If the people of a state become materialistic and especially worship the luxury goods, it will mislead and distort people’s value of the society, increase the psychological imbalance of low-income groups and affect the social harmony and stability. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Finance, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, People, People's Daily, Social, The Chinese Identity,

Respond calmly to ‘China threat theory’ [People’s Daily]

People’s Daily: the official organ of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) provides a perspective from the Chinese youth on how the ‘China threat theory’ is viewed. This piece comes from China Youth Daily, official newspaper of the Communist Youth League of China – 73-million strong (correct as of 2007) youth movement for Chinese aged between 14 and 28.

In a nutshell?

Perhaps a play on the recent pop culture revival of British propaganda poster ‘Keep Calm and Carry On‘, this Chinese interpretation reads ‘Respond calmly to external (and historical) agitation by focusing on building national strength.’

– – –

Respond calmly to ‘China threat theory’
Shi Qingren, China Youth Daily
Source – People’s Daily, published April 9, 2012

China has won acclaims for its significant economic and social achievements since thereform and opening-up, but at the same time it has been seen as a threat by manycountries.

Conflict of interest, an underlying cause of “China threat theory”

The “China threat theory” is caused by the country’s rapid growth in economic andmilitary strength, and is bound to accompany the country’s rise as a great power. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Culture, Education, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, People's Daily, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, The Chinese Identity

‘Rare’ Printing Error in the People’s Daily: Wen Jiabo misprinted as Wen Jiashi: 17 people punished 人民日报罕见错误:温家宝变温家室 17人遭处分 [Omy]

Here is something that does not seem reported in the Chinese national dailies – Xinhua, China Daily and People’s Daily (where the error occurred). Singapore’s OMy news site found that the official People’s Daily made a print error with Premier Wen Jiabao’s name – it appeared as Wen Jiashi leading to 17 staff being punished.

– – –

人民日报罕见错误:温家宝变温家室 17人遭处分
Printing Error in the People’s Daily: Wen Jiabo misprinted as Wen Jiashi: 17 people punished
Source – Omy, published January 1, 2011

(北京讯)官方《人民日报》出现罕见的低级错误,内页的标题竟将国务院总理温家宝错写成“温家室”,有17人因此遭处分。

事件引来热议,有网民希望高价收藏这份“错版”报纸,更有人列举近年媒体的错误。这段错误报道在前日出版的《人民日报》第四版的左下角出现,报道是关于温家宝主持国务院常务会议,决定实施天然林资源保护二期工程等,但是,标题却错标成“温家室主持召开国务院常务会议”。据悉,该报的值班主任,正厅级降职,而印刷厂副厂长、排版、设计等17人全被处分。

事后转载该报道的网站将错误更正,但是无法制止网民热议。 Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Communications, Culture, Internet, Media, Nationalism, Omy, People, People's Daily, Politics

FM [Yang Jeichi]: ‘No power shift Eastward’ [People’s Daily]

The Chinese speech writer behind the foreign ministry’s stance on the shifting global balance seems to be a very good one. Deftly framed to shift attention away from China’s consolidation of power, resources and relations, China maintains this –

‘The emerging trend in the world today is the gradual evolution of world power towards relative equilibrium. It is an inevitable outcome of the growing move toward multi-polarity and of deepening economic globalization and rapid revolution in science and technology.’

Very clever use of elliptical tactics in communicating China’s ‘charm offensive’.

– – –

FM [Yang Jeichi]: ‘No power shift Eastward’
China Daily
Source – People’s Daily, published August 03, 2010

Editor’s note: At a joint news conference with Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs Patricia Espinosa in Mexico City on July 30, China’s Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi was asked whether he agreed with the view that world power is shifting from the West to the East. The following are excerpts from Yang’s take on the matter:

There has been an argument that the gravity of world power is shifting from the West to the East, but it is a view hard to be subscribed.

The emerging trend in the world today is the gradual evolution of world power towards relative equilibrium. It is an inevitable outcome of the growing move toward multi-polarity and of deepening economic globalization and rapid revolution in science and technology. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Daily, Chinese Model, Communications, Media, Nationalism, People's Daily, Piracy, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power

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