Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Female deputies set sights on their new role in NPC [China Daily] #China #Women

Another continuing feature of China’s rise… competent women to rival the men.

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Female deputies set sights on their new role in NPC
By Wu Jiao
Source – China Daily, published March 8, 2013

Wearing short hair and wrapped in an army suit, her face beaten by the sun, Wen Min expresses xher feminine side through her soft voice and dimples as she smiles.

But the 28-year-old from the country’s first female unit of the marine corps, who is also a well-known sniper, came to Beijing in March as a new national legislator.

20130308-085228.jpg

Liu Yang (second from left), China’s first female astronaut and an NPC deputy, joins four other military NPC deputies in a group interview on Thursday. [Peng Hongxia for China Daily]

While meeting reporters ahead of Women’s Day, Wen recalled her life back at the barracks.

Please click here to read article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Daily, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Government & Policy, History, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Nationalism, New Statesman, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity

The beginning of a new world order [New Statesman]

Martin Jacques is one who believes the West sometimes too arrogant to acknowledge change is about with China’s ascension. In launching the second edition of his book ‘When China Rules the World: the End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order’, here he discusses some of the things China gets right. For more, check out Why do we continue to ignore China’s rise? Arrogance (Guardian, March 25, 2012)

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The beginning of a new world order
The financial crisis has seen the global economy turned on its head. And it is China rather than America that is set to dominate through both soft and hard power
by Martin Jacques
Source – New Statesman, published April 18, 2012

The 2008 financial crisis marked a fundamental shift in the relationship between China and the United States. Nothing could or would be quite the same again. The management of the US economy was revealed to have been fatally flawed, a lightly regulated financial sector almost allowed to shipwreck the entire economy. In a few short months, the crisis served to undermine a near-universal assumption of American, and western, economic competence; in contrast, China’s economic credentials have been considerably burnished. The crisis at the same time exposed the huge levels of indebtedness that have sustained the American economy, accentuated since by the financial rescue package, while underlining the financial strength of the Chinese economy, now the world’s largest net creditor with its massive foreign exchange reserves. Although hardly new, the crisis finally woke Americans up to the fact that China had become their banker, with all this meant in terms of the shifting balance of power. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Environment, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, New Statesman, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

The spark rises in the east [New Statesman]

Last year, following a decade of phenomenal growth, China became the second-biggest producer of scientific knowledge in the world. In 1998, Chinese scientists published about 20,000 articles. In 2009, they produced more than 120,000. Only the US turns out more.

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The spark rises in the east
Michael Brooks
Source – New Statesman, published 16 August 2010

China, driven by a desire for prestige and its own Nobel laureates, could soon lead the world in scientific research.

Science is rising in the east. China’s strategies for economic development, which are centred on creating a world-beating science base, don’t sound like much. They go by odd names: the 863 Programme and Project 211, for instance, and the Torch and Spark programmes. But they are proving to be more powerful than even the Chinese government could have hoped.

Last year, following a decade of phenomenal growth, China became the second-biggest producer of scientific knowledge in the world. In 1998, Chinese scientists published about 20,000 articles. In 2009, they produced more than 120,000. Only the US turns out more. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Influence, International Relations, Nationalism, New Statesman, Politics, Research

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