Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Special Report: Why China’s film makers love to hate Japan [Reuters] #RisingChina #ScarTissue

Sino-Japanese relations are riddled with scabs aplenty, and flesh wounds run viscous and deep.

Chest thumping over Japan’s real and imagined threats are not new, they have run deep since proto-nationalism in the late 1800s.

They have paid a huge cost for failing to stand up to Japan, many times in living memory for many. They will not want a repeat of losing and then having to foot the victor’s repair bill, stripping itself of means to rebuild.

Of wider note then was Chinese resistance against foreign domination that culminated in the Battle of Peking. The guns ablazing Eight-Nation Alliance made China pay them $335 million (over $4 billion in current dollars) plus interest over a period of 39 years in 1901. It is hard to find breakdowns and how much goes to, who online. However, I found them in a visit to Sun Yat Sen’s former HQ in Singapore.

The world has to be realistic. There is no reason to believe the Chinese are preparing to be defeated on this one. Give and take on smaller issues yes, but when it comes to territorial disputes, I think no chance will be given. Its maritime force is not battle tested, and will itch for battle test-worthiness.

As for the central message behind the article below, it is noteworthy how China conducts its domestic charm offensive, through making cultural capital one of its to eight priorities for this phase of rise.

Perhaps it is unsurprising the us and them perceptual tendency is being amplified by broadcast media. Only this time it isn’t one-message fits all push propaganda like the Mao era. This is now a plethora of choice with 1.3b individuals with a developing sense of identity.

The state is going all out to build an effective dominant ideology stemming intertextually through a massive media ecology on a scale the world has never seen. And through that, the modernist Chinese identity is adapting contemporary values as China’s rise and place in the world shapes its view of itself, and how it sees itself in the world. One only has to visit China and just spend a day channel surfing, to see for oneself.

The tensions and the propaganda go far beyond the current spat. Underneath it all lies a struggle for power and influence in Asia between China and Japan – and political struggles within China itself. Many China watchers believe Beijing’s leaders nurture anti-Japanese hatred to bolster their own legitimacy, which is coming under question among citizens livid over problems ranging from official corruption to rampant environmental pollution. David Lague and Jane Lanhee Lee

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Special Report: Why China’s film makers love to hate Japan
By David Lague and Jane Lanhee Lee
Source – Reuters, published Hengdian, China | Sat May 25, 2013

20130527-070649.jpg

(Reuters) – Shi Zhongpeng dies for a living. For 3,000 yuan ($488) a month, the sturdily built stuntman is killed over and over playing Japanese soldiers in war movies and TV series churned out by Chinese film studios.

Despite his lack of dramatic range, the 23-year-old’s roles have made him a minor celebrity in China. Once, Shi says, he perished 31 times in a single day of battle. On the set of the television drama “Warning Smoke Everywhere,” which has just finished shooting here at the sprawling Hengdian World Studios in Zhejiang Province, he suffers a typically grisly fate.

“I play a shameful Japanese soldier in a way that when people watch, they feel he deserves to die,” Shi says. “I get bombed in the end.”

For Chinese audiences, the extras mown down in a screen war that never ends are a powerful reminder of Japan’s brutal 14-year occupation, the climax of more than a century of humiliation at the hands of foreign powers.

Japanese foreign-policy scholars say more than 200 anti-Japanese films were made last year.

Please click here to read the full report at Reuters.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Collectivism, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, Entertainment, Government & Policy, Ideology, Influence, Infrastructure, Intellectual Property, International Relations, japan, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Media, military, Modernisation, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Reuters, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Chinese Newspaper Confuses the Japanese Military with…DeviantArt [Kotaku] #RisingChina #FourthEstate

Intertextuality disconnect: Singapore based digital artist‘s DeviantArt design shows up on Chinese state media military sections.

Link to Xinhua report here.

Link to the Global Times here.

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Chinese Newspaper Confuses the Japanese Military with…DeviantArt
By Brian Ashcroft
Source – Kotaku, published May 22, 2013

20130523-061006.jpg

source – http://meganerid.deviantart.com/

A website for Chinese newspaper Global Times recently published photos of a new Japanese military helicopter “design concept”. Too bad it’s not real. It’s not even made by the Japanese military.

On Global Times’ website Huanqiu.com, the text reads, “This appeared online today; it seems to be a concept for a Japanese Self Defense Force armed helicopter made by the Japanese military complex.” The paper also added, “One can see that because this type of technology is not yet available, it looks like something out of science fiction.”

The photos were published online in the Global Times’ “military” section. There was a gallery of “Fuujin Attack Helicopter” images, art site DeviantArt URL watermarks and all.

The story even appeared on Chinese news source Xinhua, which is like the Reuters or AP of China. The Xinhua story, which cites Global Times, also said that the Japanese Self Defense helicopter concept was “designed by a Japanese professional.”

On Chinese social networking site Weibo, people are baffled at how this helicopter would even fly. “This design looks cool but there isn’t anything special, does it even fly?” asked Weibo user hanyu_cger. “Without a tail rudder how does it maneuver?” Others thought it looks more like a comic book design than a military one. Some even claimed it was totally real, while others said it was a Japanese rip-off. Nobody really seemed to realize the DeviantArt URL (probably because it just looked like a string of English words).

On Chinese site NetEast, there are over 2,400 comments regarding these photos. Folks, apparently, are still talking about the images.

Online in Japan, people were baffled, too. On 2ch, some responded by saying things like, “What the hell is that?” Or, “I want a plastic model version of this!”

Needless to say, the Fuujin Attack Helicopter is not a real military concept. Rather, Ridwan Chandra Choa, a digital artist who previously worked at Lucasfilm Animation in Singapore, created it and uploaded it to art site DeviantArt.

The Global Times and Xinhua are real news sources in China. It’s odd that they would use images with DeviantArt watermarks to scare up fear among readers about Japanese military and technological power. Maybe they didn’t know.

This is somewhat reminiscent of the time, however, when people online in Japan confused a Blizzard staffer’s digital mecha creations with U.S. military hardware.

日本自卫队未来武装直升机构想 [Global Times/Huanqiu.com]

Eric Jou contributed to this article.

Filed under: Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Ideology, International Relations, japan, Media, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

The changing face of Asian regional governance [The Conversation] #Asia #CMIM #SinoJapanCompetition

The dominant narrative for Asian primacy requires an update – regional regulatory networks are the new chess board.

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The changing face of Asian regional governance
By Shahar Hameiri, Murdoch University
Source – The Conversation, published April 17, 2013

The growing competition between Japan and China over regional primacy is changing the face of Asian regional governance — but not necessarily in predictable ways.

While observers have focused on Asia’s baffling array of regional institutions to discern which regional power is dominant, the real story in Asia is one of emerging regulatory networks.

These regional regulatory networks (unlike Asia’s largely ineffectual multilateral institutions) are issue-specific, problem-solving mechanisms that involve national, subnational and regional agencies, even private firms.

Read the full article at its source here.

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Filed under: Asia Pacific, Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Economics, Finance, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, japan, Mapping Feelings, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

A War Between China and Japan: What It Could Cost You [OnlineMBA.com] #SinoJapaneseWar

From an online MBA guide – a hypothetical take on war between China and Japan and what this means for global trade.

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A War Between China and Japan: What It Could Cost You
Source – OnlineMBA, published February 11, 2013

Global economists are keeping their eyes glued to the Asia-Pacific region, where a bitter feud is brewing between two of the world’s most powerful nations over a small collectivity of islands in the East China Sea. The Chinese government argues that a treaty signed during the first Sino-Japanese War (1894-95) conferred ownership of the islands to China. Japan has long disputed these claims, and today argues that the islands are integral to its national identity.

The argument came to a head last September, when a boycott of Japanese products led Chinese demonstrators to target fellow citizens who owned Japanese cars. Three months later, the situation escalated when when Japanese jets confronted a Chinese plane flying over the islands; no shots were fired, but the act of antagonism has set a troubling precedent between the military forces of both nations.

The conflict between China and Japan has put the United States in a precarious position: if a full-scale war were to erupt, the U.S. would be forced to choose between a long-time ally (Japan) and its largest economic lender (China). Last year, China’s holdings in U.S. securities reached $1.73 trillion and goods exported from the U.S. to China exceeded $100 billion. The two countries also share strong economic ties due to the large number of American companies that outsource jobs to China. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Culture, Diaoyu Fishing Boat Incident 2010, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Hard Power, International Relations, japan, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

U.S. media misquotes Abe’s words: Japanese gov’t spokesman [Xinhua] #SinoJapan

Media mis-representation or stirring of the pot by the Wall Street Journal?

Update: Japan says reported remarks on China by Abe were ‘misleading’

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U.S. media misquotes Abe’s words: Japanese gov’t spokesman
Source – Xinhua, published February 22, 2012

TOKYO, Feb. 22 (Xinhua) — Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga clarified Friday that a U.S. newspaper misquoted Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s China-related remarks in an interview and led to misunderstanding.

Responding to Xinhua inquiry at a press conference, Suga said the Japanese government had clarified to China that the Washington Post incorrectly quoted Abe’s words and led to misunderstanding.

Abe has repeatedly emphasized that Japan-China relationship remains one of the most important bilateral relationship for Japan and Japan will push forward the bilateral strategic and mutually beneficial relations through an overall perspective, Suga said.

Please click <a href="http://“>here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Communications, East China Sea, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, japan, Media, military, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, U.S.

China muscles US in Pacific #TheAge #China #US #ChinaDream #GreatPower

Any facet of an assertive rising China seems to give the status quo the chills.

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China muscles US in Pacific
By John Garnaut
Source – The Age, published February 16, 2013

WITHIN two decades the United States will be forced out of the western Pacific, says a senior Chinese military officer, amid concerns that increasingly militarised great-power rivalry could lead to war.

Senior Colonel Liu Mingfu, at the People’s Liberation Army’s National Defence University, told Fairfax Media this week that American strategic influence would be confined ”east of the Pacific midline” as it is displaced by Chinese power throughout east Asia, including Australia.
Colonel Liu’s interpretation of one facet of what the new Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, calls ”a new type of great-power relationship” adds to the uncertainty and anxiety surrounding China’s strategic ambitions.

It clashes with comments days earlier by his university colleague, General Zhu Chenghu, who told a conference in the US: ”We have no intention of driving the US out of east Asia or the western Pacific.”

Please click here to read the restof the article at its source.

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Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Government & Policy, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, japan, military, Politics, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Xi questions propaganda chief’s handling of censorship row #China #Xi #Censorship #SouthernWeekly [Asahi Shimbum]

Asahi Shimbum: Japanese coverage on the Southern Weekly censorship matter.

Could this really be the case of the manufactured end of media censorship as the comment below suggests?

I think the reality and culture of the Chinese press is that it has been dynamic for a while now. The southerners have been known to be more vocal and discerning of central power – time spent in Guangdong province watching the news there will yield clues for anyone interested. Today it extends further up north – any time spent on Beijing’s local television current affairs programmes will reveal a growing number of self-analytical programmes. It’s even more apparent when one factors in Greater China, with Hong Kong and perhaps contentiously Taiwan in the mix.

If interested, Chinese-language papers such as Nandu 南都 Daily  (translated as Southern Metropolis Daily) for a start are useful to get a pulse of the Chinese fourth estate in action.

For Greater China (Taiwan) coverage on the issue, check out Wen Qian World Weekly’s investigative coverage on youtube here (in Mandarin only without subtitles  – according to the report Southern Weekly has had a reputation of being leading and cutting edge with investigative journalism –  a must watch if you can understand Mandarin:

Screen cap of the only comment left on the online page thus far, by Mark Newham. As of publishing, this article has been tweeted 71 times and shared on Facebook 53 times.

Screen cap of the only comment left on the online page thus far, by Mark Newham. As of publishing, this article has been tweeted 71 times and shared on Facebook 53 times.

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Xi questions propaganda chief’s handling of censorship row
Compiled from reports by Atsushi Okudera, Kenji Minemura and Kentaro Koyama
Source – the Asahi Shimbum, published January 14, 2013

BEIJING–In an apparent attempt to quell the uproar over censorship, Chinese leader Xi Jinping expressed displeasure toward the media control division and said he would not punish journalists who disobeyed its latest order, sources said.

Xi, general secretary of the Communist Party of China, appears to have given top priority to preventing the row from expanding further and threatening his new leadership installed in November.

Arguments for free speech erupted after the reform-oriented Southern Weekly based in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, was forced to rewrite its New Year edition before it was published on Jan. 3. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, Government & Policy, Influence, japan, Mapping Feelings, Media, New Leadership, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Xi Jinping, , , , , , , , ,

Caught in a bind that threatens an Asian war nobody wants [The Age] #China #EastChinaSea

Professor Hugh White of the Australian National University on the prospect of the world’s three richest countries going to war. Of particular long-term concern to him is how the world intends to accommodate and hedge against China’s growing power.

So how do we all get out of this bind? Perhaps creative diplomacy can find a face-saving formula that defuses the situation by allowing each side to claim that it has given way less than the other. That would be wonderful. But it would still leave the deeper causes of the problem – China’s growing power and the need to find a peaceful way to accommodate it – unresolved. That remains the greatest challenge. Hugh White

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Caught in a bind that threatens an Asian war nobody wants
By Hugh White
Source – The Age, published December 26, 2012

THIS is how wars usually start: with a steadily escalating stand-off over something intrinsically worthless. So don’t be too surprised if the US and Japan go to war with China next year over the uninhabited rocks that Japan calls the Senkakus and China calls the Diaoyu islands. And don’t assume the war would be contained and short.

Of course we should all hope that common sense prevails.

It seems almost laughably unthinkable that the world’s three richest countries – two of them nuclear-armed – would go to war over something so trivial. But that is to confuse what starts a war with what causes it. The Greek historian Thucydides first explained the difference almost 2500 years ago. He wrote that the catastrophic Peloponnesian War started from a spat between Athens and one of Sparta’s allies over a relatively insignificant dispute. But what caused the war was something much graver: the growing wealth and power of Athens, and the fear this caused in Sparta.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at the source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Diaoyu Fishing Boat Incident 2010, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Greater China, History, Influence, International Relations, japan, Mapping Feelings, military, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Uncategorized

Agencies to probe cafe over name [Straits Times] #China #Singapore #Diaoyu #EastChinaSea

Wandering China covered this news story a little over a month ago – see Sophia Rd cafe cashes in on island dispute [AsiaOne]. Now it seems, three agencies in Singapore – the Advertising Standards Authority of Singapore (Asas), the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (Acra) and the Police are going to probe the cafe over its name.

Does this marketing gimmick have enough clout to affect international relations? It looks like Singapore is about to self-regulate in an act of top-down self censorship. One wonders if it is acting on a public complaint, at all.

Why further accentuating divide where convergence could be celebrated I wonder. I had the chance to visit the cafe just a few days ago and people of all races and creed could be seen sauntering in, both out of curiousity and others, to grab an affordable meal.

Some background into the probe –

‘Advertisements should not adopt or encourage a confrontational approach to resolving societal conflicts or differences. Advertisements should not exploit or fuel conflicts relating to national problems and controversial policies or issues.’

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Agencies to probe cafe over name
Diao Yu Dao moniker draws attention of police, Acra and ad authority
By Melissa Lin
Source – Straits Times, Published Dec 25, 2012

20121225-064544.jpg
The Sophia Road cafe has a signboard bearing the words Diao Yu Dao, China’s name for the group of islands in the East China Sea whose ownership is disputed by Tokyo and Beijing. — ST PHOTO: NURIA LING

BARELY two months after opening for business, a cafe at Peace Centre – called Diao Yu Dao – has come to the attention of at least three agencies for its name linked to islands whose ownership is disputed by Japan and China.

The agencies are the Advertising Standards Authority of Singapore (Asas), the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (Acra) and the police.

Diaoyu is China’s name for the group of islands in the East China Sea. Japan, which controls them, calls them the Senkaku islands.

Please click here to read rest of the article at the source (subscription required)

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Filed under: Advertising, ASEAN, Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Chinese overseas, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Greater China, History, Influence, International Relations, japan, Mapping Feelings, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Straits Times, Strategy, Taiwan, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Japan election: LDP’s Shinzo Abe vows tough China line [BBC] #China #Japan #ShinzoAbe

Japanese comeback kid Shinzo Abe fuels election success fervor by stoking the fans of nationalism after a sumo sized election win, controlling two thirds of the 480 seat house. Poignant perhaps, as this means the political agendas of our worlds’s second and third largest economies revert to primal, historical scars as guiding compass.

In a recent interview, Mr Abe told me it was time for Japan to change its pacifist constitution so it can have a proper military and defend its own territory. He also vowed to protect every inch of Japan’s sacred land and sea – including the disputed Senkaku or Diaoyu Islands.

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Japan election: LDP’s Shinzo Abe vows tough China line
Source – BBC, published Dec 17, 2012

Mr Abe has served as Japanese prime minister once before. Photo - AP

Mr Abe has served as Japanese prime minister once before. Photo – AP

The leader of Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has vowed to take a tough stance in territorial disputes with China.

Shinzo Abe’s comments come as exit polls indicate a decisive victory for his party in Japan’s general election.

He said he wanted to “stop the challenge” from China over a chain of islands claimed by both countries.

Click here to read the rest of the article at the source.

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Filed under: BBC, Beijing Consensus, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Green China, History, Influence, International Relations, japan, military, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Uncategorized

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