Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

When it comes to China, which side is Germany on? [Guardian] #RisingChina #Germany

China and Germany teach each other lessons on contemporary influence without brandishing hard power.

On the ground, however – In a 25-country poll by the BBC (44-page PDF) published in May 2013, German opinion on China was 13% positive vs 67% negative in 2013, a marked drop – from 42% positive vs 47% negative in 2012.

– – –

When it comes to China, which side is Germany on?
Berlin’s ‘special relationship’ with Beijing means it is not keen for the EU to start a commercial war with the Asian giant
Source – The Guardian, published September 12, 2013

20130915-083945.jpg
Angela Merkel is escorted by President Xi Jinping of China after their meeting at the G20 summit this month. Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

A long-running dispute between the EU and China over the prosaic, but economically significant, matter of solar panels has thrown up a fundamental question: which side is Germany on? The trade war concerned billions of pounds of Chinese panels that Europe suspected were being heavily subsidised and then “dumped” on the European market. Germany led the opposition to taking punitive action against the Chinese.

“What is certain is that the Germans have taken up almost word for word the rhetoric of the Chinese trade ministry,” said a European diplomat from one of the countries in favour of imposing sanctions on China.

There’s a paradox at play here: it is German manufacturers who wanted the European commission to look into the solar panel issue. But for the German leadership there are bigger matters to consider, not least the country’s burgeoning “special relationship” with the Asian powerhouse.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Guardian.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Filed under: Automotive, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Ethnicity, Germany, Government & Policy, High Speed Rail, Ideology, Influence, Intellectual Property, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Soft Power, Solar, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, Transport

How CNN uses disaster to propagandize against a government [Hidden Harmonies] #RisingChina #Propaganda

On CNN agenda setting and the manufacture of dominant narratives.

For more, see
一样的出轨,两样的CNN (Guancha, July 26, 2013)

– – –

How CNN uses disaster to propagandize against a government
by Yin Yang
Source – Hidden Harmonies, published July 24, 2013

(最近,一些中国朋友对这篇文章表示兴趣。我简单解释。两年前,中国温州有高铁遇意外。最近,西班牙的高铁也有意外。右边的CNN报告是关于中国的意外。左边是报西班牙的。这两篇文章非常清楚。CNN关于中国文章的目的是骂中国。不像西班牙的报告, 唯一关于意外。这是他们的宣传技巧。这是西方媒体的宣传技巧。他们不希望中国高铁进入他们的市场。中国人,行业,社会,政府都需要被他们骂的臭臭的。)

Western propaganda has become an art-form, and for the unsuspecting audience, it is invisible. If you decide to be critical though, you will immediately see how thinly-veiled the propaganda is. Some of you might have heard about the recent high-speed rail crash in Spain, killing 69 people according to the latest count. The weird coincidence is that China’s Wenzhou crash was exactly 2 years ago.

Below are two articles from CNN reporting on the crashes. On the right column is of China’s crash two years ago and on the left column is a recent coverage for Spain’s. Notice how the Spain article is about the accident while the article on China is a condemnation of China’s HRS and governance. CNN can find tons of criticism and dwissatisfaction on Spain’s Internet too if it wants. Yes, right now. CNN can find critical things to write about the Spanish government: for example, Spain woefully under-funds its infrastructure. These are CNN’s explicit choices to make. See the glaring difference in the articles as a result of the choices CNN made. Welcome to “free” press.

Source - by Yin Yang, Hidden Harmonies, 2013

Source – by Yin Yang, Hidden Harmonies, 2013

DO note the table above is not complete , please click here to view the entire table and full article at Hidden Harmonies.

Filed under: Automotive, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, CNN, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Disaster, Education, High Speed Rail, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Transport, U.S.

Full Text: Report on the Work of the Government [Xinhua/Global Times] #China #Leadershiptransition

A legacy wraps up.

– – –

Full Text: Report on the Work of the Government
Xinhua
By Agencies
Source – Global Times, published March 18, 2013

Following is the full text of the Report on the Work of the Government delivered by Premier Wen Jiabao at the First Session of the Twelfth National People’s Congress on March 5, 2013 and adopted on March 17, 2013:

Report on the work of the government

Delivered at the First Session of the Twelfth National People’s Congress on March 5, 2013

Wen Jiabao, Premier of the State Council

Fellow Deputies,

On behalf of the State Council, I now present to you the report on the government’s work of the past five years and suggestions for its work this year for your deliberation and for comments from the members of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC). I. Review of Work in the Past Five Years

Please click here to read the rest of the strike at its source. There are altogether twelve parts.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Disaster, Domestic Growth, Economics, Finance, global times, Government & Policy, High Speed Rail, Influence, Infrastructure, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Nationalism, New Leadership, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Shanghai World Expo, Social, Soft Power, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, xinhua

China’s longest high-speed railway ‘to open Dec. 26’ [AFP] #China #Highspeedrail

Running across multiple broadsheets internationally through the AFP: China now has both the longest and fastest train link in the world despite initial hiccups. Utilising tech developed with foreign partners such as Seimens and Bombardier, this network of high speed lines are five years in the making after first being unveiled at about the time of the Beijing Olympics. In that time they have built 5,000 miles of high speed rail lines.

I had the opportunity to take the high speed rail from Shanghai to Hangzhou where it reached a top speed of about 321km/h, though that was prior to the deadly collision in July 2011.

As a point of comparison – average high speed rail speeds in leading countries (not maximum commercial speed):

Japan – 243km/h
Germany – 232km/h
France – 277km/h
U.S. – 135km/h – shared rails with conventional trains, however.

– – –

China’s longest high-speed railway ‘to open Dec. 26’
AFP
Source – News Republic, published December 15, 2012

Source - AFP, 2012

Source – AFP, 2012

The world’s longest high-speed rail route, running from the Chinese capital Beijing to Guangzhou in the south, will open for business on December 26, state media said Saturday.

Travelling at an average speed of 300 kilometres (186 miles) per hour, the line will slash journey times linking Beijing in the north with the country’s southern economic hub from 22 hours to eight hours, the China Daily newspaper said.

The December opening means the 2,298 kilometre route, with 35 stops including major cities Zhengzhou, Wuhan and Changsha, will be operational for China’s Lunar New Year holiday period, in which hundreds of millions of people travel across the country in the world’s largest annual migration. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AFP, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Collectivism, Domestic Growth, Economics, Environment, Government & Policy, High Speed Rail, Influence, Infrastructure, Modernisation, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, People, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Social, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, Trade, Uncategorized

Kublai Khan: China’s favourite barbarian [BBC]

A most interesting piece from the BBC on China’s love-hate relationships with things foreign – indeed they spent millennia building a string of walls Ripley’s Believe it or Not claimed could be seen from outer space  (yes that is the genesis of the fantastical notion that became part of some school textbooks). The study of Kublai Khan provides unique insights into what it takes for the Chinese mind to subsume a different paradigm of thinking into their collective identity.

For those who are fans of Star Trek, the Chinese, in my mind, are not unlike the Borg – they learn, assimilate making it their own.

The very last emperor of all loved bicycles, by the way. He is said to have removed doorstops in the Forbidden City so that he could cycle around, but that is another story. The point I want to make is that there is complicated history around what is Chinese… and what is not. Carrie Gracie

– – –

Kublai Khan: China’s favourite barbarian
By Carrie Gracie
Source – BBC News Beijing, published October 11, 2012

Kublai Khan who demolished 1,000 years of more or less united Chinese rule by setting up the Yuan Dynasty, a feature of which saw a Chinese civil service – “For the Song, it would been absolutely inconceivable that the Mongols could take over the whole of China,” says John Man, author of a biography of Kublai Khan.
Source – BBC, 2012

China has a love-hate relationship with what is foreign. Traditionally all people beyond the Great Wall were barbarians – only part human. But invaders have sometimes been welcomed, in time, into the Chinese family. One was Kublai Khan.

In the 13th Century, no-one knew how big the world was so it was not so wild for the Mongols to set off from the grassland with the idea that they were going to conquer all of it.

When the mighty Genghis Khan died in 1227, he had already claimed an empire stretching from the Pacific to Europe. His grandson Kublai set out to finish the job, and started by moving south to attack China’s Song dynasty. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Back to China, BBC, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Collectivism, Culture, Domestic Growth, Education, Great Wall, Greater China, High Speed Rail, Influence, Inner Mongolia, Mapping Feelings, Peaceful Development, Social, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, , , , ,

[Heilongjiang] High speed rail may need to be rebuilt [Global Times]

Rail safety and the 350km/h benchmark: China considers rebuilding the Harbin-Dalian high speed railroad, its northernmost, 904km long high speed railway. With temperatures dropping to as low as -40 degrees C in the area, Wang Mengshu, the chief engineer of the China Railway Tunnel Group  warned the Global Times certain parts of the railroad were not designed right at the onset. China’s sprawling high speed rail network may be one of the prides of nation-building, but there have been problems, like the Wenzhou crash last year.

China Railway Tunnel Group is member enterprise of the state-owned China Railway Engineering Corporation 中国中铁, the third largest civil construction enterprise in the world with 220,000 employees.

– – –

High speed rail may need to be rebuilt
By Bai Tiantian
Source – Global Times, published September 4, 2012

Part of the newly built Harbin-Dalian high speed railroad connecting Northeast China’s Heilongjiang, Jilin and Liaoning provinces is now facing reconstruction due to roadbed deformation, an expert said on Tuesday.

Wang Mengshu, chief engineer of the China Railway Tunnel Group and academician of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, told the Global Times that certain parts of the railroad were not initially designed properly.

“In regions where the temperature varies greatly around the year, frost heaving becomes a major problem in construction,” said Wang. “Designers need to pay extra attention to the amount of water in the roadbed. Too little water reduces roadbed strength, while too much water could cause deformation.” Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Civil Engineering, Domestic Growth, Economics, Environment, Finance, global times, Government & Policy, High Speed Rail, Influence, Infrastructure, Modernisation, Social, Transport, , , ,

Weather puts rail system to test [China Daily]

Chunyun 春运 is both a ‘glimpse’ into the Chinese mind of familial piety, and a reflection on the tenacity of the Chinese to facilitate this through a commitment to vast transport networks.

The Chinese spring festival or Chinese Lunar New Year sees one of the largest human migrations on the planet.

I for one have joined the ‘hoard’ by returning home from Australia to reunite with family to usher in the year of the Water Dragon.

For reference, the heightened traffic load lasts about 40 days and starts 15 days before the Lunar New Year. In 2008, the number of passenger journeys within China exceeded 2 billion. That’s moving 2  times the population of India, or more than one China in a period of little more than a month. It can be easy to criticise the faults, but lest we forget, it surely is one of the most complex operations ever, to get so many people home in time to be with family.

Hu Yadong, the deputy minister of railways expects the railway system this year to handle 5.88 million trips a day. It doesn’t quite help that the Chunyun this year, like many before, is being blitzed by snow and rain.

Whatever it is, they key takeaway is clear – there are few other priorities for the Chinese apart from being with family at this time of year.

– – –

Weather puts rail system to test
By Xin Dingding
Source – China Daily, published Jan 16, 2012

A migrant worker carries his baggage preparing to enter the Beijing Railway Station on Sunday. With the Spring Festival approaching, at least 400,000 passengers leave the capital every day. Photo: Wang Jing / China Daily

Snow, rain and fog may hamper plans of millions bound for their family reunions.

BEIJING – Two highspeed rail lines were hit by extensive delays in the past few days and the system will be tested by snow and rain forecast for the coming week.

More than a dozen services on the Beijing-Shanghai high speed line were held up for as long as two hours on Saturday, just as the Lunar New Year travel rush began to reach full swing.

Some passengers at the Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station said they heard a loud explosion and saw a flash of light at about 1:30 pm on Saturday, according to posts widely distributed on micro blogs. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: China Daily, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, High Speed Rail, Infrastructure, Mapping Feelings, Social, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Transport

The significance of China’s high-speed train crash [Straits Times]

Singapore: Straits Times correspondent Tracy Quek, and I recall sharing her sentiments both times I managed to use the high-speed rail – ‘On my first ride, I marvelled at the sleek, white carriages, the spotless interiors, the warmth of the service staff, and above all, the smoothness and comfort of the journey…. This is the way to travel! This is the face of progress! The United States (where I have been working since mid-2009) should get its act together and build its own high-speed rail network, I remember telling myself as I snapped a picture of the monitor in the cabin showing the train’s speed hitting 300km/h.’

In this instance, she reveals that little has changed over China’s handing of disasters such as this, with news that officials had ordered the damaged train carriages buried, and that China’s Railway Ministry has been less than forthright about what caused the crash, offering only vague responses to reporters seeking details.

– – –

The significance of China’s high-speed train crash
Tracy Quek, US Correspondent
Source – Straits Times, published July 26, 2011

For the past month, I have been a regular commuter on China’s high speed trains, zipping up and down the country between major cities including Nanjing, Wuxi and Shanghai.

On my first ride, I marvelled at the sleek, white carriages, the spotless interiors, the warmth of the service staff, and above all, the smoothness and comfort of the journey.

This is the way to travel! This is the face of progress! The United States (where I have been working since mid-2009) should get its act together and build its own high-speed rail network, I remember telling myself as I snapped a picture of the monitor in the cabin showing the train’s speed hitting 300km/h. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Automotive, Chinese Model, Civil Engineering, Domestic Growth, High Speed Rail, Media, Politics, Straits Times, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Transport

Wen Jiabao’s Stunning Admission at Train Crash Site [Wall Street Journal]

The Wall Street Journal reports an ‘unusual’ admission of illness, something Chinese leaders rarely do. Now could this be a measured move, or increasing humanisation the Chinese leadership’s legitimacy to lead.

‘When rumors surfaced this month that former president Jiang Zemin was gravely ill or possibly even dead, censors on China’s most popular microblogging site went so far as to block all searches containing the Chinese word for “river,”or jiang, in an effort to quash the discussion.’

Premier Wen in this instance shares that he has been bed-ridden for eleven days, which was why it took him five days to visit the crash site of the Wenzhou high-speed rail collision.

– – –

Wen Jiabao’s Stunning Admission at Train Crash Site
Josh Chin
Source – Wall Street Journal China Realtime Report, published July 28, 2011 

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, center, visits at the site of the Saturday July 23, 2011 train crash, in Wenzhou, east China’s Zhejiang province, Thursday, July 28, 2011. Photo: AP

This post has been changed since it was first posted. See below.

Why did it take Chinese premier Wen Jiabao five days to visit the site of Saturday’s deadly high-speed train collision near Wenzhou?

The answer, according to Mr. Wen: He was sick.

In a striking admission, the 69-year-old leader affectionately known as Grandpa Wen said Thursday that his arrival in Wenzhou had been delayed because he’d been laid up in bed for 11 days. “Over this time I’ve been ill,” Mr. Wen said at a news conference, though he didn’t say what the illness was. “The doctor only today reluctantly allowed me to travel.” Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Automotive, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Disaster, High Speed Rail, Influence, Media, Nationalism, People, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Social, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Transport, Wall Street Journal

Toddler pulled alive from China train crash wreckage [AP/The Age]

Unfortunate news. There had been talk earlier that corruption (Corruption Hits China’s High-Speed Railway, FT/CNBC March 24 2011) could put a grinding halt the high speed rail project with breakdowns as recent as this month – High Speed Rail breaks down again (China Daily, July 14, 2011).

58 trains have been suspended and the fault has been identified as lightning-triggered.  In Chinese fashion, the accountable will be hunted down and made an example of – Senior officials sacked after deadly train collision (China Daily, July 24, 2011).

Although this line from Hangzhou to Wenzhou which I have taken is another altogether, and older.

It looks like China’s ambitious high speed rail plans (see earlier posts – China’s rail expansion is on the fast track (Straits Times, November 8 2010)) hits a major multifaceted hurdle of engineering, corruption and people’s diplomacy. The official apology from the ministry – Ministry spokesman apologizes for deadly crash + China Daily’s updates [China Daily, July 25, 2011)

– – –

Toddler pulled alive from China train crash wreckage
AP
Source – The Age, published July 25, 2011

Off track … carriages were derailed in the accident. Photo: AP

A toddler was rescued about 21 hours after a crash involving two high-speed trains in eastern China killed at least 43 people and injured more than 200 others, state media reported.

The unconscious child was found early on Sunday evening while rescuers were clearing one of the train cars just as the cleanup efforts were almost completed. It cited an unnamed firefighter.

“When we found him, he could still move his hands,” Xinhua News Agency quoted the firefighter as saying. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, AP, Automotive, Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Civil Engineering, Corruption, Crime, Disaster, Domestic Growth, Economics, Environment, High Speed Rail, Infrastructure, Modernisation, Population, Social, The Age, Transport

Follow me on Twitter

Archives

Calendar

November 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,577 other followers

East/West headlines of Rising China

East/West headlines of Rising China

About Wandering China

Click to find out more about this project

Support //WC

Support Wandering China now - buy a Tee Shirt!

Be a champ - Support Wandering China - buy a Tee Shirt!

The East Wind Wave

China in images and infographics, by Wandering China

China in images and Infographics, by Wandering China

Wandering China: Facing west

Please click to access video

Travels in China's northwest and southwest

Wandering Taiwan

Wandering Taiwan: reflections of my travels in the democratic Republic of China

Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Click here to view the Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Slideshow reflection on Deng Xiaoping's UN General Assembly speech in 1974. Based on photos of my travels in China 2011.

East Asia Geographic Timelapse

Click here to view the East Asia Geographic Timelapse

A collaboration with my brother: Comparing East Asia's rural and urban landscapes through time-lapse photography.

Wandering Planets

Creative Commons License
Wandering China by Bob Tan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at Wanderingchina.org. Thank you for visiting //
web stats

Flag Counter

free counters
Online Marketing
Add blog to our directory.