Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Pilot Free-Trade Zone ready to launch [Global Times] #RisingChina #EconomicReform

Economic reform with the prize set on the international marketplace: One giant leap toward rising China 2.0 with pilot free-trade zone established in Shanghai.

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Pilot FTZ ready to launch
By Louise Ho in Shanghai
Source – Global Times, published September 29, 2013

A motorbike rider passes the No. 3 gate of the China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (FTZ) in Shanghai on Friday. Photo: Cai Xianmin/GT

A motorbike rider passes the No. 3 gate of the China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (FTZ) in Shanghai on Friday. Photo: Cai Xianmin/GT

The highly anticipated China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone (FTZ) will be officially launched Sunday. The first on the Chinese mainland, the FTZ is seen as an important step in China’s economic reform and the internationalization of the yuan.

The State Council, China’s cabinet, Friday issued detailed plans for the FTZ, which aims to deepen financial innovation and build a business environment that is on a par with international standards.

The 28.78-square-kilometer FTZ will cover the Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone, Waigaoqiao Bonded Logistics Zone, Yangshan Free Trade Port Area and Pudong Airport Comprehensive Free Trade Zone in Shanghai.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Domestic Growth, Finance, global times, Government & Policy, Greater China, History, Ideology, Influence, Infrastructure, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, Trade

Discipline bodies launch website [Global Times] #RisingChina #Corruption #CCDI

Rising China, corruption and social levelling via Web 2.0: new website launched for the Chinese to anonymously report on cheating officials.

New anti-graft site allows people to report cheating officials (SCMP September 3, 2013)

The site is jointly run by the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (中国共产党中央纪律检查委员会) and the Ministry of Supervision 监察部.

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Discipline bodies launch website
Zhang Xiaobo
Source – Global Times, published September 3, 2013

The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI) of the Communist Party of China (CPC) and the Ministry of Supervision on Monday jointly opened an official website, offering the public a new online channel to report corrupt officials.

The website will play a key role in combating corruption by releasing official statements and providing a new means for online corruption reporting, read a notice on the site.

“This is a great move for the Party to push forward the online anti-corruption drive, as it allows Net users to report corrupt officials via a new channel, instead of merely posting exposés on Weibo,” Li Danyang, a research fellow on public administration with the Beijing-based Beihang University, told the Global Times.

The website consists of 10 sections, including an online forum where the public can leave their opinions and proposals, as well as ask questions about anti-corruption work. It also outlines the discipline watchdog’s structure, giving the public more information on how the agency operates.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Corruption, Democracy, Domestic Growth, global times, Government & Policy, Ideology, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

Talent shows get thumbs down from regulators [Global Times] #RisingChina #CulturalCapital

China takes step toward further media convergence… 国家广播电影电视总局 + 中华人民共和国新闻出版总署 forms tag team as print and broadcast regulator.

To prevent the homogeneous development of TV programs and to provide audiences with diversified choices, a restriction was announced on July 24. A news release from The State General Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television to Xinhua stated, “Satellite broadcasters should stop investing in any new singing competition shows; shows that have already been produced, but have not yet aired, should not be aired until after the summer vacation; and the series currently being aired should be aligned with different schedules.” See Repeat Offenders (Global Times, July 28, 2013)

Also –

Hong Kong: Two powerful Chinese media regulators merge (see Mondaq.com, July 24, 2013)

According to the Plans for Institutional Reform and Functional Transformation of the State Council, the newly merged ministry of broadcast and press is principally responsible for the overall planning of the development of the press, publication, radio, film and television industries, the supervision and administration of the relevant organizations and businesses, as well as the contents and quality of publications and radio, film and television programs, and copyright administration….

The new “super ministry” was formed by combining and streamlining the functions previously performed by each of SARFT and GAPP separately on its own. Such combination does not appear to have changed the power configuration among itself, the Ministry of Culture, the Propaganda Department of the Communist Party and the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (“MIIT”).

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Talent shows get thumbs down from regulators

By Yu Jincui
Source – Global Times, published July 28, 2013

The State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT), formerly known as SARFT, is imposing new restrictions on televised musical talent shows.

It announced last week details of “regulations and controls” to cap the number of singing competition programs, demanding a stop in the creation of new entries in the genre and the postponing of the airing of shows not yet broadcast. It also warned the television stations to avoid “extravagance, dazzling packaging and sensationalism” in the shows, and encouraged originality and creativity in show content.

The purpose of the new regulation, as SAPPRFT stated on Wednesday, is to “avoid the monopoly of television programs, offer the audiences more options and satisfy people’s diverse demands for a more vibrant television culture.”

It has been reported that 13 singing talent shows were previously scheduled to be aired this summer.

Though many questioned whether Chinese audiences need so many repetitive shows, government watchdog’s decision to step in is also disfavored by quite some audience members. They think the decision should be made by the market.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Domestic Growth, Education, Entertainment, global times, Government & Policy, Great Firewall, Great Wall, Ideology, Influence, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Strategy, The Chinese Identity

No firewall for Macao’s new campus [Global Times] #RisingChina #GreatFirewall

On top of a big move from the SAR into mainland, it seems the University of Macau will continue to be exempt from the Great Firewall.

For more, check out the University of Macau’s update on their construction progress here.

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No firewall for Macao’s new campus
By Liu Sha
Source – Global Times, published July 17, 2013

The campus of the University of Macau on the Chinese mainland will be exempt from the restrictions of the Great Firewall, the university’s media officer confirmed to the Global Times Wednesday.

The Internet services on the new campus will be provided by Macao companies, the media officer, surnamed Fok, told the Global Times in an email.

The university is moving its campus from the special administrative region to Hengqin Island, Zhuhai, Guangdong Province, and the new campus will be available in September with more than 10,000 students to be relocated.

“Anything students can access on the Macao campus will be accessible in the new one,” Fok said.

Please click here to access entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, global times, Government & Policy, Great Firewall, Greater China, History, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, Intellectual Property, Media, Modernisation, Reform, Social, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity

Bright-eyed foreign graduates see internships as way onto career ladder [Global Times] #RisingChina #Internship

China looks forward to an abundant haul of foreign graduates as unemployment afflicts traditional powerhouses  attracting the best minds elsewhere in the world. Its open door toward internships allows it to gauge foreign competence on one hand, plus they get an instant infusion to synthesize first-hand foreign ideas and culture right within its doorstep.

If the foreign interns return home with positive memories, it is a public diplomacy plus point. Winners all round…

They glean from the groundwork of foreign alma maters, whilst many countries are turning increasingly protectionist in a time the notion of global village is mentioned less and less. In a way the Chinese are simply emulating what the US is still largely better at, attracting the best brains.

From facing west to east – is this “back door” gold rush a salient indicator of the changing call of fortune?

See also –

Foreign graduates flock to China for job experience (Beijing Cream July 5, 2013)

Short-sighted US driving out brightest foreign graduates (South China Morning Post May 28, 2013)

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Bright-eyed foreign graduates see internships as way onto career ladder
By Lin Meilian
Source – Global Times, published July 10, 2013

As the unemployment epidemic still spreads around the globe, leaving millions of young people out of work, more and more recent graduates are finding jobs through “backdoor” internships in China.

20130713-033049.jpg


Elizabeth Thomas works as an intern at the Beijing-based Globe-Law law firm on June 24. Photo: courtesy of Get in2 China Group Ltd.

20130713-033348.jpg

Foreign interns at the Forex Signs, Inc. (FSI) Beijing Office Photo: courtesy of Get in2 China Group Ltd.

Elizabeth Thomas, 24, a recent graduate of Knox College in the US, who had no previous law experience, is waiting for a work visa so that she can start working as a paralegal after three months interning at a Chinese law firm. She decided to stay in China for another year to build connections instead of going to law school in the States.

“Having experience here has given me an insight that most people can’t really see: working in a Chinese law firm with Chinese lawyers, studying law itself and comparing it with American law,” Thomas told the Global Times. “That is going to put me so much higher than other students applying for law schools.”

With the unemployment rate at 7.6 percent in the US, many recent graduates look to China. There are no official figures for the number of foreign interns in China as the majority of them come to China on tourist, student or business visa. However, several third-party internship organizers told the Global Times that their business is booming and the number of applications is growing.

Please click here for entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Ethnicity, global times, Government & Policy, Greater China, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Hospitals should be city’s priority – SHANGHAI [Global Times] #RisingChina #Healthcare

Global Times: Chinese fourth estate at work, using a foreign voice to draw attention to China’s public healthcare chasm.

‘Upon arriving at the hospital, I was struck by the number of people lying on gurneys in the reception area, the hall way, the corridors and throughout the hospital. China’s population problem was all the more evident from the overcrowding in the hospital. Before I could be seen, I first had to pay to register. While in some countries in the West this is commonplace, I come from England, and the idea of paying for health care was alien to me.’

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Hospitals should be city’s priority – Shanghai
By Rebecca Flood
Source – Global Times, published July 7, 2013

20130707-075020.jpg
Illustration: Lu Ting/Global Times

I recently experienced firsthand the Chinese health care system after a nasty cut on my arm left me needing stitches. Most people’s worst nightmare when abroad is illness or injury; from food poisoning to broken bones, a medical emergency seems worse when you’re thousands of miles from home.

I had lacerated my right arm on a rusty metal fence, and the cut was so deep, you could see the layer of fat under my skin. I made my way to the Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, affiliated with Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine.

Upon arriving at the hospital, I was struck by the number of people lying on gurneys in the reception area, the hall way, the corridors and throughout the hospital. China’s population problem was all the more evident from the overcrowding in the hospital. Before I could be seen, I first had to pay to register. While in some countries in the West this is commonplace, I come from England, and the idea of paying for health care was alien to me.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Domestic Growth, global times, Government & Policy, Health, Human Rights, Infrastructure, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, People, Population, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Social, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Rules shouldn’t be made to be broken – Shanghai [Global Times] #RisingChina #CivilisedSociety

There is still some way to go before Beijing consensus and civilised society go hand in hand. How the new leaders set an example is vital.

‘...following a rule is not considered a matter of pride in China. Many people think of rules as an obstacle to surmount rather than a positive social norm that can protect us from danger, chaos or unfairness, and moreover, contribute to the establishment of a lawful society. Hence, breaking a rule is regarded as a way to cut corners and save hassle. In this case, for example, the customers brought their own cart because they didn’t want to bother moving the heavy water from a supermarket trolley to their own cart. Sadly, they didn’t think of the possible consequences of their action.’ Zhang Yu

For instance, smokers are still aplenty in restaurants across all the Chinese cities I’ve traveled to. This is despite a ban since 2011 that still sees regular violators today. On occasion a waitstaff would try to dissuade the smokers but upon revelation of their party (actual or perceived) status,  the service staff always take a step back, the smoking continues. See – New Smoking ban effective in China (Xinhua, May 2, 2011) That said in 2009 – nearly 8% of Chinese revenue came from tobacco-related taxes and profits.

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Rules shouldn’t be made to be broken
By Zhang Yu
Source – SHANGHAI – Global Times, published July 3, 2013

20130704-070255.jpg
Illustration: Lu Ting, Global Times

Last month, at a supermarket in Shanghai’s Jiading district, a 66-year-old woman was struck and killed by an overloaded pushcart on an inclined moving walkway. The pushcart, which was brought into the supermarket by two customers, lacked the safety devices all supermarket trolleys have that automatically lock the wheels onto walkways. As 15 boxes of bottled water were loaded onto the cart, it plunged rapidly down the walkway after the men lost control of it.

A shocking detail of this case was the fact that not only are these carts forbidden to be used in the supermarket, but the security guard on duty noticed the cart beforehand. He tried to dissuade the men from taking the moving walkway, but after they insisted, the guard gave in, finally leading to the tragedy.

This is a classic case of rules being ignored and flouted, eventually leading to a tragedy that could so easily have been prevented. But I don’t want to assign all the blame to the two customers who used the cart or to the security guard who let them in. The deeper problem lies in our society which lacks a basic respect for rules, whether it’s a supermarket regulation or a national law.

Please click here to read the entire article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, China Dream, Chinese Model, Crime, Culture, Domestic Growth, Education, global times, Government & Policy, Ideology, Infrastructure, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Politics, Population, Reform, Social, The Chinese Identity

Man-eat-dog festival [Global Times] #RisingChina #DogMeatConsumption #Guangxi

Horse meat, dog meat, it’s getting tricky dealing with cultural preconceptions as they collide head on in global village and its 24-hour on-demand, new media cycle.

… Meanwhile, Yulin residents ask for more understanding of their local tradition. “We eat chicken, pork and beef, why not dog meat?” asked a local resident named Ma. “I hope outsiders show some respect for our traditional festival.”

Also – see No legal basis to cancel dog meat festival in Guangxi: local authorities (Want China Times, June 22, 2013):

The event, which is held once every year, highlights the city’s dog-meat culture and involves the mass consumption of dog-meat hotpot served with lychees and a strong grain liquor. The local residents consider the festival an ancient summer solstice tradition and believe that eating the dish on the specific day can help prevent illness.

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Man-eat-dog festival
By Lin Meilian
Source – Global Times, published June 24, 2013

A restaurant owner gestures at animal rights activist Du Yufeng during a verbal fight in Yulin, South China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on June 21, locally known as "Dog Meat Festival." Photo: Li Hao for the Global Times

A restaurant owner gestures at animal rights activist Du Yufeng during a verbal fight in Yulin, South China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on June 21, locally known as “Dog Meat Festival.” Photo: Li Hao for the Global Times

A dog howls at its fate at a slaughterhouse in Yulin. Photo: Li Hao for the Global Times

A dog howls at its fate at a slaughterhouse in Yulin. Photo: Li Hao for the Global Times

Local residents gather at a riverside road in Yulin to eat dog meat on June 21. Photo: Li Hao for the Global Times

Local residents gather at a riverside road in Yulin to eat dog meat on June 21. Photo: Li Hao for the Global Times

Despite widespread outrage, an annual dog meat festival kicked off on June 21 in South China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region to mark the summer solstice.

Thousands of people crowded food streets in the city of Yulin to enjoy a feast of dog-meat hotpot with lychee wine, a local tradition that is said to keep diseases at bay. It is estimated that over 10,000 dogs were killed on the one-day festival.

In an open letter to the Yulin government on June 18, 20 animal right organizations called for the festival to be cancelled.

Please click here to read the full article at the Global Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, China Dream, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, global times, Ideology, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Social, The Chinese Identity

Read me like a book [Global Times Mobile] #RisingChina #Reading

The Chinese emancipation of the mind continues as they pick up new ways to decode narratives outside their own long-curated collection. Valuing the primacy of first hand information in a time of relentless media tsunami, this project strikes a chord.

There is ample evidence of discourse at the broadcast level. Just check out the tonnes of current affairs programs on Youtube or Youku. This participatory spirit permeates through entertainment programmes too.

This may well be the best way to augment China’s social fabric in how it makes sense of the rest if the world.

Liang Jiaxin, director of the LCY living library project:

… people are the core of living libraries, and the key is connecting people from different groups, breaking barriers to communication and eliminating prejudice.

“Our slogan is ‘no truth before reading,’ because we believe much misunderstanding and prejudice comes from ignorance or lack of communication on an equal basis. Through many examples in our reading, we found that not only is prejudice reduced, but people even become more interested in learning about others.

… people are usually most interested in three categories of books: marginalized groups and people who are easily ignored or misunderstood; people with distinguishing features or experiences; and ordinary people with their own unknown stories to tell.

To better days ahead.

World views can shape behavior and drive action, and to act with grace requires consensus in the meaning and expression of grace. Hearing and seeing first hand stories with all five senses activated offers more than lines of text or crafted TV can.

If this gains traction, this should have a positive impact on how the Chinese behave as a fellow global villager.
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Read me like a book
By Liu Dong
Source – Global Times, published May 1, 2013

20130502-071728.jpg
A researcher from Sun Yat-Sen University, who is a “living book,” shares her stories with readers at a living library activity in Guangzhou on April 20. Photo: Liu Dong/GT

How can different people discard their prejudices and achieve reconciliation in the face of conflict? This was a question that a group of young people from Denmark tried to answer through a unique form of dialogue they invented in 2000 and called “Living Library.” After growing in popularity worldwide, it has now come to China.

The living library, also known as a human library, is a social movement that began in Europe when several young Danes had the idea of bringing together people from different cultural backgrounds, nations, educational levels, religions and professions to communicate on the basis of equality to dispel hostility and bias.

At a music festival in 2000, the organizers introduced 75 “books,” which were in fact 75 real people with a variety of identities, including a policeman, a Muslim, a stripper, a person living with HIV, an American Indian, and even an extremist far-right Hungarian, to the public, who could be “borrowed” and “read” just like books in a library.

Please click <a href="http://here to read the rest of the story at its source.
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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Collectivism, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, global times, Government & Policy, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Peaceful Development, People, Population, Reform, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Don’t exaggerate scope of Hong Kong quarrels with mainlanders [Global Times] #RisingChina #HongKong

Global Times Op-Ed on the need for acknowledging changing relative positions between Hong Kong and China.

One urgent priority for us is to quickly adapt to our new relative positions. Hong Kong is no longer an almsgiver and Chinese mainlanders are no longer poor and weak. China’s rise is the outcome of decades of efforts, but the achievements haven’t been so obvious until recent years. Not only foreigners, but also Chinese have to adjust our mentality.

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Don’t exaggerate scope of Hong Kong quarrels with mainlanders
Op-Ed by Shu Meng
Source – Global Times, published April 21, 2013

A video showing a quarrel between the staff of a ferry in Hong Kong and a man from the Chinese mainland has been forwarded by many people recently on social media.

In the video, a man from the Chinese mainland insisted on putting a baby carriage on a sidelined aisle on the ferry because a Hong Kong staff member on that ferry told him it’s all right. However, after a while, another staff member told the mainlander he should move the baby carriage to another place.

The mainlander refused, and a quarrel started. In the fight, the mainlander shouted “Don’t think mainlanders can be easily bullied!” Some Hongkongers yelled back “You mainlanders get out of Hong Kong!”

Please click here to read the full article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, global times, Government & Policy, History, Hong Kong, Ideology, Internet, Mapping Feelings, Media, Peaceful Development, People, Public Diplomacy, Social, The Chinese Identity, ,

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