Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

China finding superpower path no cakewalk [CNN GPS] #RisingChina #Superpower

It is doubtable Chinese strategists are overly concerned in being drafted in to compete in this imagined superpower arena – largely a battle of capturing the imagination of the majority of mindshare as to who rules the hegemonic roost.

Deng spoke of this in his address to the UN almost thirty years ago. He had a dim view of the intents of superpowers. Sensing it is more a distraction than destination the Chinese have made plain their strategies to consolidate and spread equitable development, right down to sticking to its independent foreign policy of peace (since 2003) for the next five to ten years. At least the Chinese have a working and efficient plan in place. They make it plain to see meaning it is all up for public scrutiny. In rural villages, they are summarized and inscribed onto street notice walls.

It is not hard to see how problems can arise as one gets rich too quickly. I have met those who turned from sheep farmer to Land Cruiser own within the span of a few years. But lest we forget, they are the first generation of exposure to a new social compact. Perhaps the yardstick is better measured how the next line of inheritors of the Chinese legacy fare against their global peers. More and more Chinese leave the motherland to study foreign ways but tellingly, more often than not, Chinese students I meet here look forward or feel compelled to return home.

Overseas, hotspots across the straits and those in the East and South China Sea are down to legacy issues conventional international diplomacy may not be be able to fix. Their outcomes may be limited in shaping or influencing domestic public opinion in the media saturation especially those with access to the digital revolution.

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China finding superpower path no cakewalk
By Richard Wike, Special to CNN
Source – CNN GPS, published August 6, 2013

20130828-111252.jpg
Editor’s note: Richard Wike is associate director of the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project. Follow him on Twitter @RichardWike. The views expressed are the writer’s own.

It’s not easy being a superpower, and that’s something China is learning. A few years back, international headlines featured breathless accounts of China’s economic transformation and rave reviews of the Beijing Olympics. But today, news stories often portray a country battling over disputed territories overseas, while struggling at home with vexing issues such as pollution, corruption, and political dissent. China’s power is growing, but as it assumes a more prominent role on the world stage, its global reputation is beset by a host of challenges. Welcome to the travails of being one of the big boys on the block.

While China’s rise has been the subject of considerable debate among elites in recent years, ordinary citizens around the world have also taken note, and for many it’s a troubling development. Pew Research Center polling has shown that a growing number of people see China as the world’s leading economic power. Moreover, people not only see the economic balance of power shifting; many believe that in the long run, China will surpass the U.S. as the overall leading superpower. Across the 39 countries included in a spring 2013 Pew Research poll, a median of 47 percent say China has already replaced the U.S. as the leading superpower or will eventually do so. Just one third think China will never supplant the United States.

But, as the U.S. has often learned, power does not necessarily generate affection. More typically, it creates anxiety. In regions throughout the world, people worry about how a superpower will use its clout and how it will behave in the international arena. For instance, our polling has consistently found majorities in most countries saying the U.S. ignores their interests when making foreign policy decisions – this was true during the George W. Bush era and it remains largely true today.

Please click here to read the entire article at its CNN GPS.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, CNN, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, East China Sea, Economics, Education, Government & Policy, Greater China, Hukou, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, Intellectual Property, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

New policies to boost relations [China Daily] #RisingChina #CrossStraitsTies

Toward a Greater China stance.

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New policies to boost relations
By AN BAIJIE
Source – China Daily, published June 17, 2013

Taiwan delegation members take photos at the fifth Straits Forum in Xiamen, Fujian province, on Sunday. Photo by HU MEIDONG / China Daily

Taiwan delegation members take photos at the fifth Straits Forum in Xiamen, Fujian province, on Sunday. Photo by HU MEIDONG / China Daily

The Chinese mainland will continue its “correct policies” to further consolidate peaceful cross-Straits ties, top political adviser Yu Zhengsheng said on Sunday.

Yu, chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, made the remarks in a keynote speech at the opening ceremony of the fifth Straits Forum in Xiamen, Fujian province. The forum is scheduled to continue through Friday.

“The new leadership will continue to follow the correct policies and dedicate itself to consolidating the political, economic, cultural and social foundation for the peaceful development of cross-Straits relations,” Yu said.

Please click here to read the full article at China Daily.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Democracy, East China Sea, Economics, Ethnicity, Government & Policy, Greater China, Ideology, Influence, Mapping Feelings, New Leadership, Overseas Chinese, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Soft Power, Strategy, Taiwan, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Uncategorized

Summit to avoid ‘inevitable’ US-China tensions [The Age] #RisingChina #SinoUS

Torn in a great and powerful friends dilemma, Australia’s strategy to finely leverage both its American and Chinese friendships is a challenging one.

The article below was fed across Aussie broadsheets as it comes from one of two transnational media corporations operating in Australia.

However, great power relations and perceptual tendencies (whether institutionalized, enculturated or indoctrinated) needs a twenty first century update. Using a polarizing and primal set of us and them software to decode meaning in the networked global village – raises the question, what is preventing the update – why are tensions inevitable? By design, consequence or care-lessness?

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Summit to avoid ‘inevitable’ US-China tensions
By Nick O’Malley, US correspondent for Fairfax Media
Source – The Age, published June 6, 2013

The so-called “shirt-sleeves” summit to begin between President Barack Obama and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at a glamorous estate in California on Friday will be the first of its kind in half a century, a chance for the two great powers to stave off what some fear to be inevitable tensions.

“It harkens back to Nixon and Kissinger and Mao Zedong and Zou Enlai sitting on overstuffed couches late into the night in Beijing discussing the state of the world,” says the US State Department’s former top Asia official, Kurt Campbell.

Those meetings in 1972 began the Chinese-American diplomatic relationship, a relationship that since then has been marked by mutual mistrust, not aided by the rigid formality of meetings between the two leaders.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Australia, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Economics, Finance, Government & Policy, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

Asia will resist U.S. efforts to contain China, says Singapore diplomat [Washington Times] #RisingChina #SinoAmerican #Contaiment

Note – article comes from the Washington Times October 2012…

It remains to be seen how Ashok Kumar Mirpuri is faring in the context of a much clearer Asian pivot already in place stirring up potential pincer proxy conflicts in the East and South China Sea.

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Asia will resist U.S. efforts to contain China, says Singapore diplomat
By Ashish Kumar Sen
Source – The Washington Times Sunday, October 14, 2012

Asian nations will resist any U.S. attempts to block the rise of China, as Washington pursues a new strategy in the Asia-Pacific region, according to Singapore’s former ambassador in Washington.

“I think if the United States re-engages Asia to contain China it won’t work because countries in Asia won’t sign on to containment,” Chan Heng Chee said in a phone interview from Singapore.

“We don’t want another Cold War. The United States should not ask Asian countries to choose. You may not like the results if you ask countries to choose.”

Please click here to read the full article at the Washington Times.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Economics, Finance, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, Nationalism, New Leadership, Overseas Chinese, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Singapore, Soft Power, South China Sea, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Should Taiwan and China team up against the Phillipines? 一虎一席谈2013-05-18 两岸该不该联手严惩菲律宾? [Tiger Talk] #RisingChina #Philippines

Greater China consensus at work?

Worth a watch to hear cross strait perspectives on dealing with the Philippines, an area of contention now turned consensus shared by both Taiwan and China.

That it runs like a public forum that airs diverse views is encouraging.

In Mandarin.

一虎一席谈2013-05-18 两岸该不该联手严惩菲律宾?(Youtube, May 18, 2013)

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Greater China, Ideology, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Philippines, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Chinese Newspaper Confuses the Japanese Military with…DeviantArt [Kotaku] #RisingChina #FourthEstate

Intertextuality disconnect: Singapore based digital artist‘s DeviantArt design shows up on Chinese state media military sections.

Link to Xinhua report here.

Link to the Global Times here.

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Chinese Newspaper Confuses the Japanese Military with…DeviantArt
By Brian Ashcroft
Source – Kotaku, published May 22, 2013

20130523-061006.jpg

source – http://meganerid.deviantart.com/

A website for Chinese newspaper Global Times recently published photos of a new Japanese military helicopter “design concept”. Too bad it’s not real. It’s not even made by the Japanese military.

On Global Times’ website Huanqiu.com, the text reads, “This appeared online today; it seems to be a concept for a Japanese Self Defense Force armed helicopter made by the Japanese military complex.” The paper also added, “One can see that because this type of technology is not yet available, it looks like something out of science fiction.”

The photos were published online in the Global Times’ “military” section. There was a gallery of “Fuujin Attack Helicopter” images, art site DeviantArt URL watermarks and all.

The story even appeared on Chinese news source Xinhua, which is like the Reuters or AP of China. The Xinhua story, which cites Global Times, also said that the Japanese Self Defense helicopter concept was “designed by a Japanese professional.”

On Chinese social networking site Weibo, people are baffled at how this helicopter would even fly. “This design looks cool but there isn’t anything special, does it even fly?” asked Weibo user hanyu_cger. “Without a tail rudder how does it maneuver?” Others thought it looks more like a comic book design than a military one. Some even claimed it was totally real, while others said it was a Japanese rip-off. Nobody really seemed to realize the DeviantArt URL (probably because it just looked like a string of English words).

On Chinese site NetEast, there are over 2,400 comments regarding these photos. Folks, apparently, are still talking about the images.

Online in Japan, people were baffled, too. On 2ch, some responded by saying things like, “What the hell is that?” Or, “I want a plastic model version of this!”

Needless to say, the Fuujin Attack Helicopter is not a real military concept. Rather, Ridwan Chandra Choa, a digital artist who previously worked at Lucasfilm Animation in Singapore, created it and uploaded it to art site DeviantArt.

The Global Times and Xinhua are real news sources in China. It’s odd that they would use images with DeviantArt watermarks to scare up fear among readers about Japanese military and technological power. Maybe they didn’t know.

This is somewhat reminiscent of the time, however, when people online in Japan confused a Blizzard staffer’s digital mecha creations with U.S. military hardware.

日本自卫队未来武装直升机构想 [Global Times/Huanqiu.com]

Eric Jou contributed to this article.

Filed under: Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Ideology, International Relations, japan, Media, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

A War Between China and Japan: What It Could Cost You [OnlineMBA.com] #SinoJapaneseWar

From an online MBA guide – a hypothetical take on war between China and Japan and what this means for global trade.

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A War Between China and Japan: What It Could Cost You
Source – OnlineMBA, published February 11, 2013

Global economists are keeping their eyes glued to the Asia-Pacific region, where a bitter feud is brewing between two of the world’s most powerful nations over a small collectivity of islands in the East China Sea. The Chinese government argues that a treaty signed during the first Sino-Japanese War (1894-95) conferred ownership of the islands to China. Japan has long disputed these claims, and today argues that the islands are integral to its national identity.

The argument came to a head last September, when a boycott of Japanese products led Chinese demonstrators to target fellow citizens who owned Japanese cars. Three months later, the situation escalated when when Japanese jets confronted a Chinese plane flying over the islands; no shots were fired, but the act of antagonism has set a troubling precedent between the military forces of both nations.

The conflict between China and Japan has put the United States in a precarious position: if a full-scale war were to erupt, the U.S. would be forced to choose between a long-time ally (Japan) and its largest economic lender (China). Last year, China’s holdings in U.S. securities reached $1.73 trillion and goods exported from the U.S. to China exceeded $100 billion. The two countries also share strong economic ties due to the large number of American companies that outsource jobs to China. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Culture, Diaoyu Fishing Boat Incident 2010, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Hard Power, International Relations, japan, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

U.S. media misquotes Abe’s words: Japanese gov’t spokesman [Xinhua] #SinoJapan

Media mis-representation or stirring of the pot by the Wall Street Journal?

Update: Japan says reported remarks on China by Abe were ‘misleading’

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U.S. media misquotes Abe’s words: Japanese gov’t spokesman
Source – Xinhua, published February 22, 2012

TOKYO, Feb. 22 (Xinhua) — Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga clarified Friday that a U.S. newspaper misquoted Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s China-related remarks in an interview and led to misunderstanding.

Responding to Xinhua inquiry at a press conference, Suga said the Japanese government had clarified to China that the Washington Post incorrectly quoted Abe’s words and led to misunderstanding.

Abe has repeatedly emphasized that Japan-China relationship remains one of the most important bilateral relationship for Japan and Japan will push forward the bilateral strategic and mutually beneficial relations through an overall perspective, Suga said.

Please click <a href="http://“>here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Communications, East China Sea, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, japan, Media, military, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, U.S.

Don’t try to contain China #Bloomberg #ContainChina #US

Containment = back to the wall. Classic trick in the book, little sophistication. The outcome can only be bloody. Perhaps that is the true intent. Play up the us and them, stoke Chinese nationalism, rejuvenate the US military complex.

Pankaj Mishra makes a great point – But the U.S. should resist seeing this as an opportunity for a wider “strategic containment” of China. It would further stoke Chinese nationalism, which remains a potent force. In any case, Asian countries would dislike being forced to choose between Beijing and Washington. With words followed by deeds, Obama could do well to dispel these unworkable Cold War binaries at this volatile moment.

– – –

Don’t Try to Contain China
By Pankaj Mishra
Source – Bloomberg, published February 11, 2013

In his State of the Union speech, President Barack Obama has an important opportunity to dispel some of the tensions brewing in northeast Asia, and to stress the political and economic imperatives of a post-Cold War peace across the region.

The U.S. “pivot to Asia” — a major shift in foreign policy priorities — has already provoked fears of encirclement and accusations of meddling from China. Last week’s revelation that the Chinese navy trained its weapons radar on a Japanese warship, not far from the disputed Senkaku islands, underscores the real challenges before the U.S in east Asia.

Relations between two of the world’s largest economies have deteriorated to the point where an overly patriotic pilot or drunken naval captain could set off hostilities. The U.S. is bound by treaty to defend Japan, whose position on the Senkaku islands — no dispute, and therefore no discussion necessary — is less than convincing. Increased American diplomatic and military maneuvers in Asia as part of its pivot are now prone to even more menacing interpretation by the Chinese.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.
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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Bloomberg, Chinese Model, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, military, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Securing allies amid China’s rise #StraitsTimes #China #War #US

Straits Times on the Sino-US strategic mind games at risk of becoming friction points ripe for miscalculation.

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Securing allies amid China’s rise
By Michael Richardson
Source – Straits Times, published February 4, 2013

WILL 2013 be the year when one or more of the intractable disputes in the seas off China explode into armed conflict, involving the United States in a wider war to protect its Asian allies?

The disputes are about ownership of islands, and jurisdiction over strategic maritime zones and valuable resources.

The answer should be a resounding “no”. Such a war, with no guarantees that it can be contained, would have unpredictable but potentially catastrophic consequences.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, military, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, South China Sea, Straits Times, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

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