Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

China finding superpower path no cakewalk [CNN GPS] #RisingChina #Superpower

It is doubtable Chinese strategists are overly concerned in being drafted in to compete in this imagined superpower arena – largely a battle of capturing the imagination of the majority of mindshare as to who rules the hegemonic roost.

Deng spoke of this in his address to the UN almost thirty years ago. He had a dim view of the intents of superpowers. Sensing it is more a distraction than destination the Chinese have made plain their strategies to consolidate and spread equitable development, right down to sticking to its independent foreign policy of peace (since 2003) for the next five to ten years. At least the Chinese have a working and efficient plan in place. They make it plain to see meaning it is all up for public scrutiny. In rural villages, they are summarized and inscribed onto street notice walls.

It is not hard to see how problems can arise as one gets rich too quickly. I have met those who turned from sheep farmer to Land Cruiser own within the span of a few years. But lest we forget, they are the first generation of exposure to a new social compact. Perhaps the yardstick is better measured how the next line of inheritors of the Chinese legacy fare against their global peers. More and more Chinese leave the motherland to study foreign ways but tellingly, more often than not, Chinese students I meet here look forward or feel compelled to return home.

Overseas, hotspots across the straits and those in the East and South China Sea are down to legacy issues conventional international diplomacy may not be be able to fix. Their outcomes may be limited in shaping or influencing domestic public opinion in the media saturation especially those with access to the digital revolution.

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China finding superpower path no cakewalk
By Richard Wike, Special to CNN
Source – CNN GPS, published August 6, 2013

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Editor’s note: Richard Wike is associate director of the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project. Follow him on Twitter @RichardWike. The views expressed are the writer’s own.

It’s not easy being a superpower, and that’s something China is learning. A few years back, international headlines featured breathless accounts of China’s economic transformation and rave reviews of the Beijing Olympics. But today, news stories often portray a country battling over disputed territories overseas, while struggling at home with vexing issues such as pollution, corruption, and political dissent. China’s power is growing, but as it assumes a more prominent role on the world stage, its global reputation is beset by a host of challenges. Welcome to the travails of being one of the big boys on the block.

While China’s rise has been the subject of considerable debate among elites in recent years, ordinary citizens around the world have also taken note, and for many it’s a troubling development. Pew Research Center polling has shown that a growing number of people see China as the world’s leading economic power. Moreover, people not only see the economic balance of power shifting; many believe that in the long run, China will surpass the U.S. as the overall leading superpower. Across the 39 countries included in a spring 2013 Pew Research poll, a median of 47 percent say China has already replaced the U.S. as the leading superpower or will eventually do so. Just one third think China will never supplant the United States.

But, as the U.S. has often learned, power does not necessarily generate affection. More typically, it creates anxiety. In regions throughout the world, people worry about how a superpower will use its clout and how it will behave in the international arena. For instance, our polling has consistently found majorities in most countries saying the U.S. ignores their interests when making foreign policy decisions – this was true during the George W. Bush era and it remains largely true today.

Please click here to read the entire article at its CNN GPS.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, CNN, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, East China Sea, Economics, Education, Government & Policy, Greater China, Hukou, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, Intellectual Property, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Population, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade, U.S.

How CNN uses disaster to propagandize against a government [Hidden Harmonies] #RisingChina #Propaganda

On CNN agenda setting and the manufacture of dominant narratives.

For more, see
一样的出轨,两样的CNN (Guancha, July 26, 2013)

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How CNN uses disaster to propagandize against a government
by Yin Yang
Source – Hidden Harmonies, published July 24, 2013

(最近,一些中国朋友对这篇文章表示兴趣。我简单解释。两年前,中国温州有高铁遇意外。最近,西班牙的高铁也有意外。右边的CNN报告是关于中国的意外。左边是报西班牙的。这两篇文章非常清楚。CNN关于中国文章的目的是骂中国。不像西班牙的报告, 唯一关于意外。这是他们的宣传技巧。这是西方媒体的宣传技巧。他们不希望中国高铁进入他们的市场。中国人,行业,社会,政府都需要被他们骂的臭臭的。)

Western propaganda has become an art-form, and for the unsuspecting audience, it is invisible. If you decide to be critical though, you will immediately see how thinly-veiled the propaganda is. Some of you might have heard about the recent high-speed rail crash in Spain, killing 69 people according to the latest count. The weird coincidence is that China’s Wenzhou crash was exactly 2 years ago.

Below are two articles from CNN reporting on the crashes. On the right column is of China’s crash two years ago and on the left column is a recent coverage for Spain’s. Notice how the Spain article is about the accident while the article on China is a condemnation of China’s HRS and governance. CNN can find tons of criticism and dwissatisfaction on Spain’s Internet too if it wants. Yes, right now. CNN can find critical things to write about the Spanish government: for example, Spain woefully under-funds its infrastructure. These are CNN’s explicit choices to make. See the glaring difference in the articles as a result of the choices CNN made. Welcome to “free” press.

Source - by Yin Yang, Hidden Harmonies, 2013

Source – by Yin Yang, Hidden Harmonies, 2013

DO note the table above is not complete , please click here to view the entire table and full article at Hidden Harmonies.

Filed under: Automotive, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, China Dream, CNN, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Disaster, Education, High Speed Rail, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Transport, U.S.

China’s youngest comrades: Communists at college [CNN] #RisingChina #Ideology #CCPYouth

Leveraging a political head start where ideological adherence brings great reward.

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China’s youngest comrades: Communists at college
By Jonathan Levine, for CNN
Source – CNN, published May 1, 2013

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Source – CNN File image from 2012 shows students graduating in Anhui Province — many students are targeted for recruitment by the party.

Beijing (CNN) — Allan Yang would be a success story in any country.

Originally from China’s impoverished interior, he was the first member of his family to leave his native Anhui province and is now pursuing an MBA at the prestigious Tsinghua University in Beijing.

At 24, Yang is the face of new China: erudite, sophisticated and a card-carrying member of the Communist Party.

“It’s just like applying for university in the United States,” he said of the party. “You give an application letter and submit some reports that test your knowledge of Communist history.”

In fact the process is a bit more complicated. Unlike applying to college, a successful application for membership in the Chinese Communist Party typically takes years. Arduous “observational periods” are required when prospective members are expected to read the classics of Socialism, become steeped in the party ideology and submit an unending series of essays that are little more than long paeans to the party’s greatness.

Please click here to read the full article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, CNN, Collectivism, Confucius, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Government & Policy, Ideology, Influence, Mapping Feelings, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, People, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity

Chinese travelers the world’s biggest spenders [CNN] #RisingChina

Winds of change five years ahead of schedule in UN forecast.

CNN reports China now matters most as top source of global tourism cash having spent US$100b on outbound tourism.

UNWTO says the volume of international trips by Chinese travelers grew from 10 million in 2000 to 83 million in 2012, making it the world’s fastest-growing market.

The Great Wall’s floodgates are open.

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Chinese travelers the world’s biggest spenders
By Karla Cripps, CNN
Source – CNN, published April 5, 2013

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By 2015, 100 million Chinese will travel abroad, a benchmark originally forecast for 2020, according to the UNWTO.

(CNN) — Chinese travelers are now the top source of tourism cash in the world, according to a new report by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO).

Boosted by a rising Chinese currency, Chinese travelers spent a record US$102 billion on international tourism in 2012, a 40 percent rise from US$73 billion in 2011.

The results fall right in line with China’s outbound tourism growth over the last 10 years.

The UNWTO says the volume of international trips by Chinese travelers grew from 10 million in 2000 to 83 million in 2012, making it the world’s fastest-growing market.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Advertising, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, CNN, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Education, Government & Policy, Great Wall, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Medicine, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, People, Population, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Tourism, Trade, U.S.

Is Kim Jong Un in control? [CNN GPS] #ChinaNorthKoreaUS

Combined the US and China could put a quick end to this latest run of gun blazing in the Korean Peninsula. The longer these world leaders dally divided, the more room for North Korea to miscalculate.

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Is Kim Jong Un in control?
By Jason Miks
Source – CNN GPS, 5 April, 2013

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South Korean media has reported today that two medium-range missiles have been loaded onto mobile launchers along North Korea’s east coast, and that they are ready to be launched. The report comes at the end of another tense weak on the Korean Peninsula that has seen an announcement by the U.S. that it is sending missile defenses to Guam and a North Korean statement that its army has final approval for nuclear strikes against the United States.

In a Situation Room special, CNN’s Wolf Blitzer spoke with Fareed Zakaria to get his take on North Korea’s rhetoric, how serious the latest threats are, and China’s potential role in easing tensions.

Is it time to send some sort of diplomatic envoy to Pyongyang on behalf of the president of the United States?

Well, the Bush administration actually did try diplomacy. They signed two agreements with the North Koreans. Plenty of people did. The problem is that they cheat on them. They’ve cheated on every one of these.

There’s only one country with whom diplomacy would work with North Korea, and that’s China. The Chinese make up by some estimates 50 percent of North Korea’s food, and about 80 percent of its fuel. There are people in China who literally opened the taps and allowed North Korea to survive.
Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, CNN, Communications, Foreign aid, Government & Policy, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, Media, military, New Leadership, North Korea, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Opinion: China’s positive spin on Africa [CNN] #China #Africa #MediaRepresentation

CNN on the grey lines of good intentions: Does Chinese media present a radical challenge to Western style journalism? Perhaps it simply fills the gaps of Western style newsworthiness?

This discussion on creeping self-reflexive ideologization in agenda shaping by the media and its political economy-  still reeks of imposition however way it is phrased – telling Africa what to do, and how to do it.

Above all, we expect that China will not just continue to reshape Africa in the coming years, but that Africa itself will force the likes of CCTV and Xinhua to participate in more intensive internal and external discussions about freedom of expression, the links between media, human rights and development, and the commercial durability of an artificial good news show.

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Opinion: China’s positive spin on Africa
By Harry Verhoeven and Iginio Gagliardone, Special to CNN
Source – CNN, published December 18, 2012

Editor’s note: Harry Verhoeven is Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Oxford’s Department of Politics & International Relations and is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network (OUCAN). Iginio Gagliardone is Research Fellow at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford.

(CNN) — Last week, Beijing’s leading English-language newspaper, China Daily, begun publishing a weekly Africa edition, focusing on financial news and targeting Africa’s growing middle class.

Earlier this year, China’s international broadcaster, CCTV, launched an impressive media operation in Africa, producing one hour a day of content from the continent as well as feature programs on African affairs, through a newsroom of more than 40 Chinese and 70 African staff members.

Both initiatives add to the more established activities of China’s news agency, Xinhua, which in recent years has deepened its partnerships with African media outlets and provides them with news from across the world as well as from the dozens of African countries where it has correspondents.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at the source. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Africa, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, CNN, Communications, Culture, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Media, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

China’s mystery man faces struggle at home and abroad [CNN]

So, Obama will be at the helm of the US again. Now attention naturally turns to China.

Sometimes it is what seems apparent.

China’s obaque system will be intensely under scrutiny. But it’s always been apparent what the outcome of the Chinese leadership transition would look like – with Xi arguably at the helm. The Chinese will soon gather for their interpretation of a ‘democratic’ vote at the highest level to install the cogs in the wheel with an outlook of ten years in their sights.

Depending on how one is informed, the role of media in shaping opinion and worldviews continues to hold substance today.

Here we know to also understand what the Chinese think.

What is apparent to the average Chinese media consumer, on a traditional diet of top-down state media, to provocative provincial media, to fact that the humble village outcry that could prompt government intervention numbers close to 200,000 recorded mass incidents annually.

Add on the fact that by numbers they are the world’s biggest virtual network, with a technological equivalence of dominant western network technology. Yet beyond the obvious ‘parallelling’, the Chinese are known for their diligence to copying and modelling, for anyone who investigates Chinese art, thought, or training. They have the world’s largest and most participative public sphere online and that means the world’s largest workforce is also the most socially networked, an important skill for the twenty-first century. A place where cultural differences are less apparent, nor important. This is something perhaps a wider body of the rest of the world should learn too –

I am fortunate for this analysis by my father. He is one who has well-experienced the ups and downs of fledgling free market of China by doing business across the east coast of China for a period of five years. He maintains an extensive network of business contacts in China who keep him in tune with how China is from within.

He starts by simply stating, everything is already decided before Nov 8, 2012.

To the Chinese, he unflinchingly feels, domestic outcry is their biggest concern.

The loss of markets – meaning loss of jobs will be the real reason for the bigger outcry (quite similar to the U.S. at the present moment – where employment in a time of massive economic restructuring are overarching).

So they will toe the line, the goal is simply not to lose markets and making customers uncomfortable. People need to remember China itself is huge customer with 1.3 billion domestic market. Anyone who has travelled to China as a tourist can see the overwhelming (not all) domestic tourists at first hand would see this. Therefore, economic downturn or not, so under adverse economic conditions, all will come to terms (i think).

He goes on to talk about its social structure, fast reconfiguring to the twenty-first century, but not quite there yet. A good fit is still some way away.

He feels they would not mind losing thousands of unhappy well-informed middle-class every now and then. That said, they definitely do not want to have millions of those who lack means to get out to wreck havoc from within. Simply put, their main task: making sure majority of 1.4bln have the basic needs, continue to sell hope and they continue to rule.

So, for a further glimpse into catches a glimpse of the amount of pubic sphere discourse on the US elections on Chinese TV… Here’s a top five list of great Chinese current affairs programmes for a peek into their abundant, internal discourse.

1. 文茜的世界週报 http://www.ctitv.com.tw/newchina_video_c134v103030.html – ‘Wen Qian: the purpose of her show is to help taiwanese & chinese speaking audience keeping up with china’

2. 一虎一席谈 http://phtv.ifeng.com/program/yhyxt/ – ‘usual phoenix tv mission of reaching worldwide chinese, the show always show different views’
3. 解码陈文茜 http://phtv.ifeng.com/program/jmcwq/ ‘quite similar to Wen Qian’s taiwan show’
4. 风云对话 http://phtv.ifeng.com/program/fydh/ – Yuan Feng: 阮 is very well respected by international political watchers’

5. 社会能见度 http://phtv.ifeng.com/program/shnjd/– ‘going in depth into china social ills’

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China’s mystery man faces struggle at home and abroad
By Stan Grant
Source – CNN, published November 6, 2012

Beijing (CNN) — Xi Jinping is a mystery. So much so that the presumed leader-in-waiting of the world’s most populous nation could vanish for more than a week without any explanation being given.

In September this year, Xi disappeared. It sparked a flurry of rumors: he’d had a heart attack, suffered a stroke, was injured swimming, and had even gone on strike.

Xi eventually re-appeared and normal transmission was resumed. But should we be so surprised? Barely an analyst I’ve spoken to can say they really know him, or what type of leader he would be. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, CNN, Collectivism, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, New Leadership, Overseas Chinese, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

‘On China:’ Experts discuss new generation of leaders [CNN]

A snippet from CNN’s new series that started airing October 17th – On China, ahead of the 18th National Congress in November.

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‘On China:’ Experts discuss new generation of leaders
By Hilary Whiteman, CNN
Source – CNN, published October 17, 2012

Victor Gao: A former member of the Chinese Foreign Service and translator for the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping.
Source – CNN, 2012

Editor’s note: Each month, CNN’s Kristie Lu Stout will sit down with three China experts to discuss what’s really driving this world power and economic giant. “On China” premieres on CNN International on Wednesday, October 17 at 5.30 p.m. HKT (5.30 a.m. ET.) This month’s guests include former Chinese Foreign Service member Victor Gao, well-known Chinese author and blogger Hung Huang, and American journalist and author John Pomfret.

Hong Kong (CNN) — A long way from the big-spending, flag-waving spectacle of competing U.S. presidential campaigns, a momentous leadership change is quietly unfolding in the world’s second largest economy.

In November, thousands of specially chosen members of China’s Communist Party will converge on Beijing for the 18th National Congress. There, they’ll announce who’ll fill the soon-to-be-vacant roles of president, vice president, premier and assorted chiefs of important government departments.

Ahead of the congress, CNN’s Kristie Lu Stout sat down with three prominent China watchers — Victor Gao, Hung Huang and John Pomfret — to discuss the leadership change and their views on the fate of the country and its ruling Communist Party. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, CNN, Communications, Domestic Growth, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Media, New Leadership, Overseas Chinese, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S., , , , , , , ,

Zakaria: Democracy in China? [CNN]

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria weighs in to China’s democracy debate in the wake of arguably China’s first openly democratic elections. Will ground-up calls for democracy spread?

His two cents?

‘Change in today’s China is rarely bottom-up and sweeping in nature. If there’s going to be change, for now it’s going be incremental and it will come from the top down.’ *Click on source link below to check out the video*

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Zakaria: Democracy in China?
By Fareed Zakaria
Source – CNN, published March 12, 2012

You rarely hear the words “China” and “election” in the same breath. Unlike the U.S., France, or Egypt – all of which do have elections coming up – China has a “leadership transition” this year. This is a planned event where handpicked individuals are promoted up.

But there were real elections in China last week – of the people and by the people. There was a democratic vote with real ballots, real candidates, and real, clean results.

Welcome to Wukan. It’s a small fishing village in South-East China, just a few hundred miles from Hong Kong. The story began a few months ago, when the villagers of Wukan protested against a “land grab”. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, CNN, Corruption, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Government & Policy, Influence, Mapping Feelings, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Reform, Social, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Wukan

Peter Kiernan: U.S. becoming ‘China’s bitch’ [CNN/Youtube]

How can the U.S. deal with China’s rise?

Despite the provocative title, Becoming China’s Bitch: And Nine More Catastrophes We Must Avoid Right Now takes a ‘centrist’ perspective to investigate the paralysis that is holding the U.S. back from pre-eminence.

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Peter Kiernan: U.S. becoming ‘China’s bitch’
CNN interview with Erin Burnett
Source – Youtube, published March 07, 2012 

Former Goldman Sachs partner Peter Kiernan shares his concerns about China replacing the U.S. as the world’s top economy.

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, CNN, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Politics, Resources, Soft Power, Strategy, U.S.

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