Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

China’s online population rises to 591 million [AP] #RisingChina #DigitalDivide

Going out to the masses via the wire agencies: China continues to bridge its digital divide.

For more, see China Internet Network Information Center.

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China’s online population rises to 519 million
Source – Associated Press, published July 17, 2013

BEIJING (AP) – China’s population of Internet users has grown to 591 million, driven by a 20 percent rise over the past year in the number of people who surf the Web from smartphones and other wireless devices, an industry group reported Wednesday.

The end-of-June figures from the China Internet Network Information Center represent a 10 percent rise in total Internet use over a year earlier. The number of wireless users rose to 464 million.

The communist government encourages Internet use for business and education but tries to block access to material deemed subversive or obscene. The rise of Web use has driven the growth of new Chinese industries from online shopping and microblogs to online video.

Please click here to read the entire article at the AP site.

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Filed under: AP, Beijing Consensus, Censorship, Charm Offensive, China Dream, Chinese Model, Collectivism, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Education, Government & Policy, Great Firewall, Human Rights, Ideology, Influence, Infrastructure, Internet, Media, Modernisation, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity

China’s Xi harks back to Mao in party ‘cleanup’ [AP] #RisingChina #Corruption

The exemplary clean up is inevitable with every leadership change – how far down the root it goes is the question that remains unanswered – will there be no sacred cows this time?

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China’s Xi harks back to Mao in party ‘cleanup’
by GILLIAN WONG
Source: Associated Press Mobile, published June 20, 2013

In this June 18, 2013 photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, China's President Xi Jinping addresses a conference on the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China's (CPC) campaign aimed at boosting ties between CPC members and the public, in Beijing. China’s leadership wants to show a cynical public that it’s modernizing and serious about graft, but it appears to be favoring a top-down ideological campaign - with study sessions, self-criticism and propaganda - over imposing real checks on power. That worries many observers, not only because they doubt it will work, but because the tactic appears to be ripped out of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong’s playbook. Photo - AP Photo/Xinhua, Liu Jiansheng

In this June 18, 2013 photo released by China’s Xinhua News Agency, China’s President Xi Jinping addresses a conference on the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China’s (CPC) campaign aimed at boosting ties between CPC members and the public, in Beijing. China’s leadership wants to show a cynical public that it’s modernizing and serious about graft, but it appears to be favoring a top-down ideological campaign – with study sessions, self-criticism and propaganda – over imposing real checks on power. That worries many observers, not only because they doubt it will work, but because the tactic appears to be ripped out of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong’s playbook. Photo – AP Photo/Xinhua, Liu Jiansheng

BEIJING (AP) – China’s new leader Xi Jinping is commanding wayward Communist Party cadres to purify themselves of corruption, and he’s summed it up in a pithy slogan as Mao Zedong might have done: Look in the mirror, take a bath.

China’s leadership wants to show a cynical public that it’s modernizing and serious about graft, but it appears to be favoring a top-down ideological campaign – with study sessions, self-criticism and propaganda – over imposing real checks on power. That worries many observers, not only because they doubt it will work, but because the tactic appears to be ripped out of the playbook of Mao, the founder of Communist China.

“Winning or losing public support is an issue that concerns the Communist Party’s survival or extinction,” Xi said in a message via teleconference Tuesday to top party cadres gathered in groups in their provinces and cities nationwide.

Please click here to read the full article at AP Mobile.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, AP, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Corruption, Crime, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Economics, Finance, Government & Policy, Ideology, Influence, Infrastructure, Mapping Feelings, Modernisation, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Reform, Social, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity

Chinese talent show captivates Taiwanese, raises concern about China’s cultural influence [AP] #RisingChina #CulturalCapital #我是歌手

20130417-085237.jpg

Image SourceChinasmack, 2013

我是歌手: Hunan Satellite TV imports the South Korean singing competition reality show I’m A Singer format to great effect. Another feather in China’s cultural capital hat, this time with a wider regional audience while boasting cutting edge production.

… she was “stunned” that the Chinese talent show was able to put as many as 38 cameras to work simultaneously to capture the best details of the performance. Taiwan’s Culture Minister Lung Ying-tai

To catch videos of the final on Youtube, see – Yu Quan beats Terry Lin to clinch the Music King title (Asian Pop News, April 14, 2013)

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Chinese talent show captivates Taiwanese, raises concern about China’s cultural influence
AP
Source – Washington Post, published April 16, 2013

TAIPEI, Taiwan — A Chinese singing competition that has captivated television viewers in Taiwan is raising concerns about China’s cultural influence on the island.

“I Am A Singer” features professional singers from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong in a tense competition. The slickly produced show earned top ratings and even attracted veteran singers to try their luck and revive their careers.

Friday night’s final episode of the Hunan Satellite TV station show featured four Taiwanese and three mainland Chinese competitors, and many Taiwanese TV stations aired part or all of the finale, won by Chinese duo Yu Quan.

Taiwan’s Terry Lin and Aska Yang were runners-up. Taiwanese veterans Julia Peng and Winnie Hsin, who ranked fifth and sixth, got a chance to show their exuberant singing and become the sensations they didn’t earlier in their long careers.

Taiwan-produced songs and music programs once dominated Mandarin song markets. But over the past decade, many of its top singers have left the island for the fast-growing Chinese market.

Taiwan’s Culture Minister Lung Ying-tai says the island’s edge in the pop-song market may be fading quickly.

Please click here to read the full article at its source.

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Filed under: AP, Art, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Entertainment, Greater China, Influence, Lifestyle, Mapping Feelings, Media, Peaceful Development, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, Soft Power, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Washington Post

China submits oceanic claims to United Nations #EastChinaSea [AP]

China’s foreign ministry augments its stance on the East China Sea flashpoint with Japan by taking the international stakeholder’s route, submitting its East China Sea claims for multilateral consideration with the UN.

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China submits oceanic claims to United Nations
CHRISTOPHER BODEEN – Today
Source – AP, published December 15, 2012

BEIJING (AP) – China provided the United Nations with detailed claims to waters in the East China Sea on Friday, apparently padding out its legal argument in an ongoing territorial dispute with Japan.

The Foreign Ministry said it submitted documents claiming waters extending beyond its 200-nautical-mile (370-kilometer) exclusive economic zone. It said geological features dictated that China’s claim extended to the edge of the continental shelf off the Chinese coast, about 200 kilometers (124 miles) from Japan’s Okinawa island.

A statement posted to the Foreign Ministry’s website gave no specifics, but China had pledged to make such a submission shortly after its dispute with Japan over uninhabited islands in the East China Sea flared again in September. Japan angered China by buying the islands from their private Japanese owners to block a rival bid by Tokyo’s nationalist mayor, a move Japan had hoped would prevent a bigger crisis.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at the source.

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Filed under: AP, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Diaoyu Fishing Boat Incident 2010, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Influence, International Relations, japan, Mapping Feelings, Media, Modernisation, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Chinese writer Mo Yan wins Nobel literature prize [Associated Press]

Guan Moye, better known as his pen name Mo Yan 莫言, the Chinese author behind Red Sorghum, The Garlic Ballads and Big Breasts & Wide Hips wins the Nobel Literature Prize to some Chinese fanfare, perhaps dyslexic over the suggested political posturing of Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Peace Prize in 2010.

Once described by Donald Morrison as “one of the most famous, oft-banned and widely pirated of all Chinese writers” (see Holding up half the sky, Time 2005), this demonstrates in some part, a shift in how the Beijing consensus has broadened its stock to include homegrown literary talent that is respected overseas, widening the range of representations into its collective identity.

Poignant… that Hu Xijin 胡錫進, editor-in-chief of the Global Times is suggesting on his microblog (a search for 胡錫進 on Weibo revealed that ‘In accordance with the relevant laws, regulations and policies, “Mr Hu Xijin search results are not displayed.’ I digress. Reportedly he alludes to the fact that the Chinese mainstream cannot be kept out for long.

For a look at news coverage from China and the UK –

China Daily – Is Mo Yan man enough for the Nobel? (October 9, 2012)

Xinhua – News Analysis: How did Mo Yan win China’s first Nobel Prize in Literature? (October 12, 2012)

The Australian – China’s Mo Yan wins Nobel for literature (October 11, 2012)

Fox News got their report from the AP – Chinese writer Mo Yan wins Nobel literature prize; known for bawdy, sprawling tales (October 11, 2012)

The Guardian – Mo Yan’s Nobel prize for literature sparks celebration in China (October 11, 2012)

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Chinese writer Mo Yan wins Nobel literature prize
by Karl Ritter and Louise Nordstrom
Source – Agency – AP, published October 11, 2012

In this photo taken Monday, Oct 22, 2007, Chinese writer Mo Yan speaks during an interview at a teahouse in Beijing. Mo won the Nobel Prize for literature Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. Source – AP Photo: Aritz Parra

STOCKHOLM (AP) – Chinese writer Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize in literature on Thursday, a cause of pride for a government that had disowned the only previous Chinese winner of the award, an exiled critic.

National television broke into its newscast to announce the prize – exceptional for the tightly scripted broadcast that usually focuses on the doings of Chinese leaders.

The Swedish Academy, which selects the winners of the prestigious award, praised Mo’s “hallucinatory realism” saying it “merges folk tales, history and the contemporary.” Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AP, Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Influence, Intellectual Property, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Media, Nationalism, Nobel Prize, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, , , , , ,

Vietnamese police crush anti-China protest [AP/Yahoo News]

For a glimpse of the anti-China protests, check out the AP youtube video below that comes complete with voxpops of protesters on the streets.

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Vietnamese police crush anti-China protest
AP
Source – Yahoo News, published August 21, 2011

HANOI, Vietnam – Vietnamese police swooped in and crushed an anti-China rally Sunday, arresting dozens of protesters who refused to stop chanting and forcing them onto two buses that were driven away.

The move followed stern warnings last week that Hanoi would no longer tolerate the weekly demonstrations that have taken place in the capital for the past 10 weekends over disputed territory in the South China Sea.

About 50 protesters showed up at Hanoi’s landmark Hoan Kiem Lake, unfurling banners and shouting anti-China slogans. Main streets in the capital’s tourist district were quickly blocked off by police and the protesters were dragged onto public buses by security officers. Many clung to the windows and doors, still shouting from inside while holding up their signs. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AP, Beijing Consensus, Domestic Growth, Economics, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, military, Politics, Strategy, Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Vietnam

Toddler pulled alive from China train crash wreckage [AP/The Age]

Unfortunate news. There had been talk earlier that corruption (Corruption Hits China’s High-Speed Railway, FT/CNBC March 24 2011) could put a grinding halt the high speed rail project with breakdowns as recent as this month – High Speed Rail breaks down again (China Daily, July 14, 2011).

58 trains have been suspended and the fault has been identified as lightning-triggered.  In Chinese fashion, the accountable will be hunted down and made an example of – Senior officials sacked after deadly train collision (China Daily, July 24, 2011).

Although this line from Hangzhou to Wenzhou which I have taken is another altogether, and older.

It looks like China’s ambitious high speed rail plans (see earlier posts – China’s rail expansion is on the fast track (Straits Times, November 8 2010)) hits a major multifaceted hurdle of engineering, corruption and people’s diplomacy. The official apology from the ministry – Ministry spokesman apologizes for deadly crash + China Daily’s updates [China Daily, July 25, 2011)

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Toddler pulled alive from China train crash wreckage
AP
Source – The Age, published July 25, 2011

Off track … carriages were derailed in the accident. Photo: AP

A toddler was rescued about 21 hours after a crash involving two high-speed trains in eastern China killed at least 43 people and injured more than 200 others, state media reported.

The unconscious child was found early on Sunday evening while rescuers were clearing one of the train cars just as the cleanup efforts were almost completed. It cited an unnamed firefighter.

“When we found him, he could still move his hands,” Xinhua News Agency quoted the firefighter as saying. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: 52 Unacceptable Practices, AP, Automotive, Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Civil Engineering, Corruption, Crime, Disaster, Domestic Growth, Economics, Environment, High Speed Rail, Infrastructure, Modernisation, Population, Social, The Age, Transport

Protesters burn police vehicles in China [The Age]

Associated Press: Guangdong, China’s hotbed of manufacturing and the province that should more accurately known as the world’s factory. Unrest seems to have become more frequent (or perhaps media scrutiny simply more intense) – eyewitness accounts speak of unrest against the authorities over ill treatment of migrant workers. None of such reports in either Xinhua or China Daily. An Al Jazeera article that might be interesting – Security tight in riot-torn South China city (Al Jazeera, June 14, 2011) which states – ‘Residents of Xintang said they had been told not to go out at night or transmit photos of the unrest online.’  More to investigate.

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Protesters burn police vehicles in China
AP
Source – The Age, published June 14, 2011

There are reports that Chinese police cars were smashed by protestors. Photo: AP

Protesters in southern China’s manufacturing hub torched emergency vehicles in an outburst of anger against police abuse of migrant workers, eye-witnesses said.

Sunday night’s rioting followed three days of steadily growing unrest in the town of Xintang in Guangdong province, the centre of China’s crucial export industry. Accounts of the violence have been sparse in state-controlled media, but the official Xinhua News Agency says a government team has been sent to the area to quell rumours surrounding the unrest.

While violent protests in China have become frequent over the past decade, recent weeks have seemed particularly turbulent. The vast region of Inner Mongolia last month saw its biggest street demonstrations in two decades, while a man angry over land seizures set off three home-made bombs at government buildings in a southern city, killing three people and wounding at least nine others. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Al Jazeera, AP, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Economics, Human Rights, Migrant Workers, Migration (Internal), People, Politics, Population, Reform, Social, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

US does not brand China ‘currency manipulator’ [The Age/AP]

The value of the yuan comes into the spotlight again as the US Treasury concludes that China was allowing the yuan to appreciate against the dollar; rendering the term ‘currency manipulator’ now invalid.

By trying to limit the pace of appreciation, China is not allowing the exchange rate to serve as a tool to counter inflation in its own economy…” US Treasury

In other reports…

US says China yuan undervalued, but not manipulated (Reuters, May 27, 2011)

China Must Let Yuan Rise Faster, Treasury Tells Congress (Bloomberg Business Week, May 28, 2011)

China not manipulating currency: US Treasury (China Daily/Xinhua, published May 28, 2011)

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US does not brand China ‘currency manipulator’
Veronica Smith
AP
Source – The Age, published May 28, 2011

The United States on Friday called on China to speed up progress in making its currency more flexible, but refrained from branding Beijing a currency manipulator, a move that could trigger sanctions.

In a long-delayed report to Congress, the US Treasury said it had concluded that China was allowing the yuan, or renminbi, to appreciate against the dollar and had shown willingness to continue promoting exchange-rate flexibility.

The Treasury Department cited “the ongoing appreciation of the renminbi against the dollar since June 2010” as well as “China’s public statements asserting that it will continue to promote RMB exchange rate flexibility.” Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AP, Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Domestic Growth, Economics, Finance, Influence, International Relations, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, The Age, U.S., Yuan

China’s premier to visit tsunami-hit area in Japan [Yahoo News/AP]

China’s Premier Wen Jiabao visit to Fukushima is pitched as a personal choice by Assistant Foreign Minister Hu Zhengyue as  a personal choice to ‘express the concern and condolences of the Chinese government and people toward those affected by the disaster and to encourage their recovery and show Chinese support for the reconstruction.’

– – –

China’s premier to visit tsunami-hit area in Japan
AP
Source – Yahoo News, published May 18, 2011

Premier Wen Jiabao will visit Japan’s devastated northeast this weekend to show China’s support for reconstruction efforts after the twin earthquake and tsunami disasters, a Foreign Ministry official said Wednesday.

Wen will be in Japan anyway to take part in a trilateral meeting with the leaders of Japan and South Korea and bilateral talks with his Japanese counterpart.

Assistant Foreign Minister Hu Zhengyue told reporters at a briefing in Beijing that Wen himself decided to visit Fukushima and that the head of China’s Earthquake Administration, among other officials, would accompany him on the May 21-22 trip. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: AP, Charm Offensive, Diaoyu Fishing Boat Incident 2010, Foreign aid, Influence, International Relations, japan, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, Yahoo 7 News

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