Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

A War Between China and Japan: What It Could Cost You [OnlineMBA.com] #SinoJapaneseWar

From an online MBA guide – a hypothetical take on war between China and Japan and what this means for global trade.

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A War Between China and Japan: What It Could Cost You
Source – OnlineMBA, published February 11, 2013

Global economists are keeping their eyes glued to the Asia-Pacific region, where a bitter feud is brewing between two of the world’s most powerful nations over a small collectivity of islands in the East China Sea. The Chinese government argues that a treaty signed during the first Sino-Japanese War (1894-95) conferred ownership of the islands to China. Japan has long disputed these claims, and today argues that the islands are integral to its national identity.

The argument came to a head last September, when a boycott of Japanese products led Chinese demonstrators to target fellow citizens who owned Japanese cars. Three months later, the situation escalated when when Japanese jets confronted a Chinese plane flying over the islands; no shots were fired, but the act of antagonism has set a troubling precedent between the military forces of both nations.

The conflict between China and Japan has put the United States in a precarious position: if a full-scale war were to erupt, the U.S. would be forced to choose between a long-time ally (Japan) and its largest economic lender (China). Last year, China’s holdings in U.S. securities reached $1.73 trillion and goods exported from the U.S. to China exceeded $100 billion. The two countries also share strong economic ties due to the large number of American companies that outsource jobs to China. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Culture, Diaoyu Fishing Boat Incident 2010, East China Sea, Government & Policy, Hard Power, International Relations, japan, Nationalism, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Strategy, Tao Guang Yang Hui (韬光养晦), The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, Trade

You Can’t Hack a Steakhouse [Foreign Policy] #China #Hacking #US

I suppose this deserves a tongue in cheek response.

Did anyone check who recently started to run the steakhouse?

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You Can’t Hack a Steakhouse
What China doesn’t get about how Washington works.
By Hayley Barbour, Ed Rogers
Source – Foreign Policy, published February 25, 2013

20130227-072902.jpg Photo – Foreign Policy, 2013

Last week, we learned that the Chinese government had hacked into the computers of some of Washington’s most prominent organizations — law firms, think tanks, news outlets, human rights groups, congressional offices, embassies, and federal agencies — not to steal intellectual property or unearth state secrets, but rather to find out how things get done in the nation’s capital. According to the Washington Post, hackers were “searching for the unseen forces that might explain how the administration approaches an issue … with many Chinese officials presuming that reports by think tanks or news organizations are secretly the work of government officials — much as they would be in Beijing.” In other words, it appears that Chinese hackers have a lot of time on their hands and don’t know much about Washington. There are probably instances where a massive database and a fancy algorithm can tell you what you need to know about a place, but D.C. isn’t one of them.

“They’re trying to make connections between prominent people who work at think tanks, prominent donors that they’ve heard of and how the government makes decisions,” the Post reported one informed expert as saying. “It’s a sophisticated intelligence-gathering effort at trying to make human-network linkages of people in power, whether they be in Congress or the executive branch.” Well, it’s possible to use espionage to learn the inside thinking at one of Washington’s prestigious think tanks. Or you could just attend any of the dozens of daily seminars, issue briefings, and the like in town, raise your hand, and get a direct answer to almost any question. You might even get a free bagel and a cup of coffee.

In Washington, you don’t need a satellite to find out who is raising money for whom. Just look at the co-host list of an invitation to any fundraiser. And if the Chinese really want to get a look at where the power decisions get made, send an undercover eater to see who’s dining with whom at the Four Seasons for breakfast, Tosca for lunch, and the Palm or Oceanaire for dinner. And here’s a secret in Washington the Chinese haven’t hacked into yet: Actual decision-makers will meet with the actual experts and affected parties in order to make as informed a decision as possible. Shhhh. Don’t tell the Chinese.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Cyberattack, Government & Policy, International Relations, Internet, Media, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Technology, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S.

Int’l shortage sees Chinese nurses in high demand [Global Times] #China #Health #CharmOffensive

Chinese nurses as a next phase in the Chinese public diplomacy toolbox as global interdependence increases.

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Int’l shortage sees Chinese nurses in high demand
By Lin Meilian
Source – Global Times, published February 25, 2012

20130226-083408.jpg
Source – Global Times An instructor inspects nurses’ outfits during a training session at a training base of the PLA General Hospital in Beijing. Photo: CFP

In the near future, maybe as soon as September, elderly people in Germany will be treated by the first batch of foreign nurses sent from China, greeting them in German with a Chinese accent.

German labor authorities and the Chinese Ministry of Commerce signed an agreement at the end of last year to send about 150 Chinese nurses to work in German care homes, aiming to help plug a shortfall of medical personnel in the country.

“It is an exception to our usual recruitment as our partner in such a specific field this time, China, is not a European country,” said Beate Raabe, press officer of the Federal Employment Agency, the largest service provider in the German labor market.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Chinese overseas, Economics, Education, Germany, Health, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Migrant Workers, Public Diplomacy, Social, Soft Power, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

New Leader of China Plans a Visit to Moscow [New York Times] #China #XiJinPing #Russia

China makes a big move to solidify its network of friendly powers. Russia is perhaps the most important of all.

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New Leader of China Plans a Visit to Moscow
By JANE PERLEZ

Source – New York Times, published: February 21, 2013

BEIJING — The Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, has selected Moscow as his first foreign capital to visit as president, to be followed immediately by a trip to South Africa for a summit meeting of the group of leading emerging-market countries.

His predecessor, Hu Jintao, also chose Moscow as his first overseas stop after assuming office, but Mr. Xi’s journey to Russia has a special significance, analysts say. It comes as China tries to answer the Obama administration’s shift toward Asia, a policy that is viewed with suspicion in Beijing as an effort to contain China.

His predecessor, Hu Jintao, also chose Moscow as his first overseas stop after assuming office, but Mr. Xi’s journey to Russia has a special significance, analysts say. It comes as China tries to answer the Obama administration’s shift toward Asia, a policy that is viewed with suspicion in Beijing as an effort to contain China.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Government & Policy, History, Influence, International Relations, New Leadership, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Russia, Soft Power, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Support for Bo grows before China’s ‘trial of the century’ [The Age] #China #BoXilai

The Age from Australia does an update on the Chinese leadership’s most high level purge in recent years.

This may digress, but a visit to Chongqing earlier this year was most useful to get a feel of Bo Xilai’s work – it was a largely cultured and sophisticated city where for once, crossing roads were not matters of life and death. Motorists did not ignore traffic signals. And people queued for cabs, food, anything, in an orderly fashion. It sure was different from the dozen over cities visited prior. Alas, it is hard to tell from an endless stream of secondary sources claiming to understand the dramatics of this high level purge.

Though the source is unnamed – the quote does give some semblance of a useful point – ‘‘A dead pig has no fear of boiling soup,” said the associate, who grew up close to the Bo family in Zhongnanhai. ”It is the party that has a very hot potato in its hands.”

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Support for Bo grows before China’s ‘trial of the century’
By John Garnaut
China correspondent for Fairfax Media
Source – The Age, published February 13, 2013

20130224-080945.jpg

BEIJING: The purge of Bo Xilai is in danger of losing momentum as the maverick political star remains defiant and associates question the fairness of keeping him in jail while other tainted leaders remain free.

Support for the charismatic and polarising leader has grown over the Spring Festival break as powerful princelings visit one another’s families and gather to share opinions and information, several princelings and close observers have told Fairfax Media.

One lifelong associate of Mr Bo said the handling of the case was a challenge for the Communist Party rather than Mr Bo, whose political execution was not in doubt.

”A dead pig has no fear of boiling soup,” said the associate, who grew up close to the Bo family in Zhongnanhai. ”It is the party that has a very hot potato in its hands.”

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Bo Xilai, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Corruption, Government & Policy, Media, New Leadership, Politics, Reform, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity

U.S. media misquotes Abe’s words: Japanese gov’t spokesman [Xinhua] #SinoJapan

Media mis-representation or stirring of the pot by the Wall Street Journal?

Update: Japan says reported remarks on China by Abe were ‘misleading’

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U.S. media misquotes Abe’s words: Japanese gov’t spokesman
Source – Xinhua, published February 22, 2012

TOKYO, Feb. 22 (Xinhua) — Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga clarified Friday that a U.S. newspaper misquoted Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s China-related remarks in an interview and led to misunderstanding.

Responding to Xinhua inquiry at a press conference, Suga said the Japanese government had clarified to China that the Washington Post incorrectly quoted Abe’s words and led to misunderstanding.

Abe has repeatedly emphasized that Japan-China relationship remains one of the most important bilateral relationship for Japan and Japan will push forward the bilateral strategic and mutually beneficial relations through an overall perspective, Suga said.

Please click <a href="http://“>here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Communications, East China Sea, Hard Power, Influence, International Relations, japan, Media, military, Nationalism, Peaceful Development, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Soft Power, Strategy, U.S.

One fly per square metre- – – China mulls hygiene standards for public restrooms [Xinhua] #China #Civilized #Hygiene

Toilet reform: Wow, what a standard to set. Does this take the step to civilization a fly too far on steroids? I found clean public toilets rare during my travels, but this was no fault of the cleaners. The culture of toilet use is probably where attention should be.

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China mulls hygiene standards for public restrooms
Source – Xinhua, published February 21, 2013

BEIJING, Feb. 21 (Xinhua) — Health authorities have issued a draft regulation that sets standards for public toilets, including limits for odor intensity and the number of flies and maggots.

The draft also sets requirements for the design, layout, construction and daily management of public toilets.

According to the rules, toilets attached to other buildings should contain no more than one fly per square meter. For independent public toilets, each square meter should contain no more than three flies.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Government & Policy, Health, People, Population, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Social, The Chinese Identity

Who guards the green guards? [China Daily] #GreenChina #China

Chin Daily performing role of fourth estate on China’s gaps in its green leap forward.

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Who guards the green guards?
By Wu Wenchong and Jiang Xueqing
Source – China Daily, published February 21, 2013

20130222-084411.jpg

Children from a primary school in Longling county, Yunnan province, introduce endangered fish into the Jinsha River near the Xiangjiaba hydropower project, which borders Longling in Yunnan and Yibin in Sichuan province. [Zeng Lang / for China Daily]

The system tasked with safeguarding and assessing the possible environmental damage caused by infrastructure and construction projects is outmoded and badly in need of reform, as Wu Wenchong and Jiang Xueqing report from Beijing.

‘Smog” and “haze” have become buzzwords this winter after severe air pollution choked China for several weeks. Equally severe are the country’s polluted surface water, ground water and farmland soil. In the face of the worsening levels of pollution, experts have blamed the problem on the disorderly discharge of all kinds of fumes and waterborne waste. They come from factory processes and emissions as well as auto exhausts, during China’s 20-plus years of rapid industrial development.

The laws and regulations, which date to the 1970s, were designed to tackle much lower levels of environmental pollution, and now insiders say that only the Environmental Impact Assessment system – tasked with assessing the potential environmental risk posed by any given project before construction begins – has the ability to be the first line of defense against pollution.
However, many experts believe that the system, instigated with the intention of preventing pollution before it can occur, no longer serves the purpose for which it was established, because the pass rate of projects under assessment is almost 100 percent.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Climate Change, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, Green China, Pollution, Public Diplomacy, Reform, Resources, Social, The Chinese Identity

China to introduce carbon tax [China Daily] #China #GreenChina

China’s green leap forward gets serious to put paid allegations of a smokescreen carbon levy. State media talks up China moving forward with a modest carbon tax; at 50 yuan a ton, it is a fraction of Australia’s.

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China to introduce carbon tax
Source – Xinhua, in China Daily, published February 19, 2013

BEIJING – China will proactively introduce a set of new taxation policies designed to preserve the environment, including a tax on carbon dioxide emissions, according to a senior official with the Ministry of Finance (MOF).

The government will collect the environmental protection tax instead of pollutant discharge fees, as well as levy a tax on carbon dioxide emissions, Jia Chen, head of the ministry’s tax policy division, wrote in an article published on the MOF’s website.

It will be the local taxation authority, rather than the environmental protection department, that will collect the taxes.

Please click here to read the rest of the article at its source.

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Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Climate Change, Domestic Growth, Economics, Finance, Government & Policy, Green China, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Strategy, The Chinese Identity, Trade

Countries Ranked by Military Strength (2013) by Country [Global Firepower] #China #Hardpower #Military

China’s military strength is ranked third by a 2013 ranking by the Global Firepower database.

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Countries Ranked by Military Strength (2013) by Country
By theGlobal Firepower website, updated February 17, 2013

The GFP ranking makes use of over 40 factors to determine each nation’s Power Index (“PwrIndx”) score. From this score, the finalized ranking is generated. The factors are set within our algorithm which provides a fair canvas and allows smaller, technologically advanced nations to compete with larger, lesser-developed ones. Additionally, various bonuses and penalties are added for refinement. In the end, we hope it presents an unbiased ranking and realistic outlook on the conventional military firepower and strength of a given country for a given year. At the very least, this list can be used to stir healthy debate amongst visitors to GFP.

There are a total of 68 countries in the GFP database. Keep in mind that the final rankings are always being fine-tuned based on new data becoming available as well as feedback. The last major update occurred on 2/17/2013.

1 United States of America PwrIndx: 0.2475
2 Russia PwrIndx: 0.2612
3 China PwrIndx: 0.3644
4 India PwrIndx: 0.4355
5 United Kingdom PwrIndx: 0.5181
6 France PwrIndx: 0.6156
7 Germany PwrIndx: 0.6484
8 South Korea PwrIndx: 0.6547
9 Italy PwrIndx: 0.6831
10 Brazil: 0.6903

Please click here to access the rest of the rankings at the GFP site.

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Hard Power, Influence, military, Strategy, Uncategorized

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