Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Four-party academic forum on Diaoyutais opens in Taichung [Focus Taiwan]


Running since 2009 and jointly organised by the National Chung Hsing University and Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, this is one of Taiwan’s approaches to the East China Sea dispute – academic dialogue.

Interesting how the article postures a disagreement on semantics.

Liu Jiangyong, a professor from Tsinghua University in Beijing, got things off to an unproductive start when he noted that China calls the archipelago the Diaoyu islands and said that while the Republic of China calls them the Diaoyutais, the ROC is “not a country.”

 – – –

Four-party academic forum on Diaoyutais opens in Taichung
Source – Focus Taiwan, Central News Agency, published October 19, 2012

Source – Focus Taiwan, 2012

A symposium on the disputed Diaoyutai (Diaoyu or Senkaku) islands in the East China Sea was held Friday in Taichung in central Taiwan.

The symposium was co-sponsored by Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and National Chung Hsing University, and brought together officials and scholars from Taiwan, China, Japan and the United States.

Philip Yang, deputy secretary-general of the National Security Council, who hosted the first meeting of the symposium, said sovereignty claims over the uninhabited island group can be explored through dialogue and law.

“We hope to solicit the views of foreign scholars on the settlement of sovereignty disputes,” Yang said.

The symposium focused on the current controversy surrounding the islands, future developments and the impact on regional order, as well as Taiwan’s strategy concerning the dispute.

Liu Jiangyong, a professor from Tsinghua University in Beijing, got things off to an unproductive start when he noted that China calls the archipelago the Diaoyu islands and said that while the Republic of China calls them the Diaoyutais, the ROC is “not a country.”

Liu said the islands should be referred to as “China’s Diaoyu Islands,” or “Diaoyu Islands, Yilan County, Taiwan Province, China.” According to Liu, this would “avoid confusion.”

Yang responded firmly that the “Diaoyutai Islands are inherent ROC territory.”

Vice Foreign Minister Tung Kuo-yu stated the Taiwan government stance that whether in terms of geology or historical record, the islands are affiliated with Taiwan and have nothing to do with Japan’s Okinawa prefecture, under which the islands are administered.

Tung also said that President Ma Ying-jeou’s East China Sea Peace Initiative proposal, which advocates that the parties involved should put aside their differences and jointly develop resources in the area, will help stabilize the East China Sea situation.

A Japanese scholar expressed a positive view of Ma’s initiative.

Yoshikazu Kato, a research fellow from Harvard University’s John F Kennedy School of Government, said the spirit of the initiative is good, but the most important thing is that related parties should share their ideas.

Kato said controversy surrounding the islands, called the Senkaku in Japan, does in fact exist, contradicting the Japanese government’s stance that there is no dispute as the islands belong to Japan. He said the Japanese government used a poor description when it said it “nationalized” the island group when it purchased three of the islets from their private owner Sept. 11.

He also said that some scholars think the United States should be a mediator and play a constructive role in the dispute, and that a three-way dialogue among the United States, China and Japan would be conducive to settling the dispute.

The ministry has co-hosted the symposium along with universities since 2009.

Advertisements

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, East China Sea, Education, Government & Policy, Greater China, Influence, International Relations, Mapping Feelings, Nationalism, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Resources, Soft Power, Strategy, Taiwan, Territorial Disputes, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities, U.S., , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,577 other followers

East/West headlines of Rising China

East/West headlines of Rising China

About Wandering China

Click to find out more about this project

Support //WC

Support Wandering China now - buy a Tee Shirt!

Be a champ - Support Wandering China - buy a Tee Shirt!

The East Wind Wave

China in images and infographics, by Wandering China

China in images and Infographics, by Wandering China

Wandering China: Facing west

Please click to access video

Travels in China's northwest and southwest

Wandering Taiwan

Wandering Taiwan: reflections of my travels in the democratic Republic of China

Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Click here to view the Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Slideshow reflection on Deng Xiaoping's UN General Assembly speech in 1974. Based on photos of my travels in China 2011.

East Asia Geographic Timelapse

Click here to view the East Asia Geographic Timelapse

A collaboration with my brother: Comparing East Asia's rural and urban landscapes through time-lapse photography.

Wandering Planets

Creative Commons License
Wandering China by Bob Tan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at Wanderingchina.org. Thank you for visiting //
web stats

Flag Counter

free counters
Online Marketing
Add blog to our directory.
%d bloggers like this: