Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

Chinese general rattles sabre [The Age]


Another Chinese general comes to the fore challenging the current crop of communist leaders for ‘betraying their revolutionary heritage’. This comes as a time as China seeks to remind the rest of the world of its peaceful intentions; one of a harmonious rise. He states categorically  –

“‘Military culture is the oldest and most important wisdom of humanity… Without war, where would grand unity come from? Without force, how could fusion of the nation, the race, the culture, the south and the north be achieved?”

The PLA is increasingly growing its own voice amidst the politician’s drive for a united front, voice and public image. It seems nationalism is driven to new heights (with now what seems explicit fevour) as China continues to revive itself as a great power. Just last year, General Liu Yazhou was an example – Chinese general backs the American dream [The Age, August 11, 2010], though his slant was different.

Note – thanks Ronald for pointing this out.

– – –

Chinese general rattles sabre
John Garnaut
Source – The Age, published May 23, 2011

General Liu Yuan. Source – The Age

A RISING star of the People’s Liberation Army has called for China to rediscover its ”military culture”, while challenging unnamed Communist Party leaders for betraying their revolutionary heritage.

General Liu Yuan displays sympathy for Osama bin Laden, says war is a natural extension of economics and politics and claims that ”man cannot survive without killing”.

His essay, written as a preface to a friend’s book, says ”history is written by blood and slaughter” and describes the nation-state as ”a power machine made of violence”.

General Liu’s public glorification of what he sees as an innate but previously suppressed Chinese military culture reveals an undercurrent that is driving the Communist Party’s increasing assertiveness at home and abroad.His essay emerges at an awkward time internationally, after Army Chief of Staff Chen Bingde last week travelled to Washington with reassurances about China’s peaceful intentions.

Chinese President Hu Jintao promoted General Liu this year to be Political Commissar of the PLA’s General Logistics Department, after making him a full general in 2009, and some expect he will receive a two-stage promotion into the Central Military Commission, the military’s top leadership body.

General Liu is also an important leader among the dozens of ”princelings” whose parents founded the People’s Republic and are now claiming dominant positions in politics, business and rising through the military.

His father was Liu Shaoqi, who was Mao Zedong’s anointed successor until Mao’s Red Guards threw him in jail and left him to die.

General Liu was purged with his family during the Cultural Revolution and then left Beijing to begin his career as a grassroots official in the countryside in the early 1980s, in parallel with the current boss of Chongqing city, Bo Xilai, and China’s likely next president, Xi Jinping.

”Military culture is the oldest and most important wisdom of humanity,” writes General Liu, inverting a traditional Chinese formulation that military affairs are subordinate to civilian culture. ”Without war, where would grand unity come from? Without force, how could fusion of the nation, the race, the culture, the south and the north be achieved?”

While overtones of 1930s Japanese and German militarism will be internationally disconcerting, the essay also opens a window into the institutional, ideological and personal struggles that are intensifying before next year’s leadership transition.

It is effectively a clarion call for the true heirs of the communist revolution to rediscover their fighting spirit and reinvent a rationale for their existence.

”No-surrender Communist Party members,” writes General Liu. ”Let’s start again.”
Pointedly, General Liu distinguishes ”no-surrender” cadres from unnamed top leaders who he says have sold out to foreign interests and ideologies.

”Actually, the party has been repeatedly betrayed by general secretaries, both in and outside the country, recently and in the past,” he writes.

The essay is written as a preface to a collection of political essays, Changing Our View of Culture and History, by left-leaning intellectual Zhang Musheng, whose father was also a senior cadre.

General Liu backs Mr Zhang’s call to save the Communist Party by turning the ideological clock back by more than 60 years, to ”new democracy”.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/world/chinese-general-rattles-sabre-20110522-1eyyu.html#ixzz1NAzq1hEs

Advertisements

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Charm Offensive, Chinese Model, Communications, Culture, Democracy, Domestic Growth, Economics, Government & Policy, Greater China, Influence, International Relations, Media, military, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Strategy, The Age, The Chinese Identity, The construction of Chinese and Non-Chinese identities

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,575 other followers

East/West headlines of Rising China

East/West headlines of Rising China

About Wandering China

Click to find out more about this project

Support //WC

Support Wandering China now - buy a Tee Shirt!

Be a champ - Support Wandering China - buy a Tee Shirt!

The East Wind Wave

China in images and infographics, by Wandering China

China in images and Infographics, by Wandering China

Wandering China: Facing west

Please click to access video

Travels in China's northwest and southwest

Wandering Taiwan

Wandering Taiwan: reflections of my travels in the democratic Republic of China

Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Click here to view the Wandering China, Resounding Deng Slideshow

Slideshow reflection on Deng Xiaoping's UN General Assembly speech in 1974. Based on photos of my travels in China 2011.

East Asia Geographic Timelapse

Click here to view the East Asia Geographic Timelapse

A collaboration with my brother: Comparing East Asia's rural and urban landscapes through time-lapse photography.

Wandering Planets

Creative Commons License
Wandering China by Bob Tan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at Wanderingchina.org. Thank you for visiting //
web stats

Flag Counter

free counters
Online Marketing
Add blog to our directory.
%d bloggers like this: