Wandering China

An East/West pulse of China's fourth rise from down under.

China’s CCP: What makes it tick [Straits Times]

Here is a critique of China’s ruling party by Australian China-watcher Richard McGregor, who asserts a few points with his book – ‘The Chinese people themselves, many of them are global citizens. They are not going to bend for some sort of peasant from Hunan.’

He points out the models China relies on to build its own framework for updating its governance, i.e. Singapore (both one-partied very largely) and maybe more pertinently, Taiwan (I see them as being simply, Chinese with a democratic worldview). It was also interesting that despite his pointing out of the most resounding reality of all – that the Chinese model currently works.

‘…the system has also proved to be flexible and protean enough to absorb everything that has been thrown at it, to the surprise and horror of many in the West.’ Richard McGregor

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China’s CCP: What makes it tick
By Ho Ai Li, Taiwan Correspondent
Source – Straits Times, published June 27, 2010

Taipei: While titans like Mao Zedong bestrode the China of yesteryear, the country has grown too sophisticated for the rule of strongmen, says China-watcher Richard McGregor.

‘It’s a big, complex global economy. You can’t have people like Mao making ridiculous demands on the production of grain or steel,’ he told The Sunday Times.

‘The Chinese people themselves, many of them are global citizens. They are not going to bend for some sort of peasant from Hunan,’ said Mr McGregor, the author of a recently released book on the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

The 52-year-old Australian spent more than a decade as a correspondent in China. A former Beijing bureau chief for The Financial Times, he is now based in London as the paper’s deputy news editor.

Mr McGregor said given that the CCP was involved in everything in China, basing his book on the party was ‘the obvious thing’. Read the rest of this entry »

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Filed under: Chinese Model, Culture, Domestic Growth, Nationalism, Politics, Singapore, Straits Times, Taiwan, The Chinese Identity

World Cup’s spell on war and peace [Straits Times]

Like many countries, the World Cup means more to China than just the soccer. For this rising power, it heralded in a new capacity of headspace not involving political propaganda. One can argue it introduced agendas of another sort, but the fact remains that other ideas and ideals were able to creep into the Chinese mind. Whilst the Chinese have always found sport as a useful way to discipline their nation, soccer/or football to be more accurate, has proven over the years to have a peculiar nature of liberation. With football, there was never simply quiet and undermined appreciation. At the football, celebrations were always earth shattering and uninhibited.

‘For the first time since the revolution (of 1949), the Chinese nation, exhausted by the Communist Party’s incessant political campaigns, realised that the world could be excited by something other than Marxism and class struggle,‘ wrote Beijing-based observer Daniel Bell, citing historian Yu Maochun.

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World Cup’s spell on war and peace
The most-watched sporting event has influenced events beyond the pitch
By Peh Shing Huei, China Bureau Chief
Source – Straits Times, published June 27, 2010

Beijing: Most people know 1978 to be the year that China opened its door to landmark economic reforms that brought momentous change to the world’s most populous country.

What they may not know is that it was also the year China allowed, for the first time, live broadcasts of World Cup matches, bringing excitement to hundreds of thousands of Chinese.

Those screenings in June 1978, say analysts, were a turning point in the political history of China.

‘For the first time since the revolution (of 1949), the Chinese nation, exhausted by the Communist Party’s incessant political campaigns, realised that the world could be excited by something other than Marxism and class struggle,’ wrote Beijing-based observer Daniel Bell, citing historian Yu Maochun.

The World Cup is more than just football. For the past 80 years, the most-watched sporting tournament has influenced events beyond the pitch, shaping politics, ending wars and even repairing the souls of divided nations.

As U2 rock star Bono said in an ESPN advertisement in 2006 to get Americans excited about the event, the World Cup ‘closes the schools, closes the shops, closes a city and stops a war’.

His lyrical summation may be a tad dramatic, but it is not entirely hyperbole.

Such is the nationalistic allure of the World Cup that factions in the Ivory Coast’s civil war put aside their weapons to pick up TV remote controls to support their country’s debut in the 2006 tournament. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Beijing Consensus, Chinese Model, Culture, Greater China, International Relations, Nationalism, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Sport, Straits Times, Strategy

Hu visits Bombardier plane maker [China Daily]

Bombardier Inc makes some really awesome looking transportation machines! Check them out here.

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Hu visits Bombardier plane maker
By Wu Jiao
Source – China Daily, published June 27, 2010

Toronto – Chinese President Hu Jintao squeezed time out his busy schedule in Toronto to tour the Bombardier plane maker, a sign expected to further enhance the cooperation between Chinese aerospace industry and the European giant.

The event also marks the last item of Hu’s three-day state visit paid to Canada, in which Hu and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper pledged to double its trade to $60 billion by 2015. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Canada, China Daily, Economics, Influence, International Relations, Politics, Trade

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